Skip to main content

Episode 6: Coaching Edition

B2B Tonight Transcript

Ryan O'Hara:

Me?

Ryan O'Hara:

Why? Yeah?

Jeff:

I don't know, you're a little fuzzy on my end, too.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hmm. Maybe it's the internet or something.

Richard Harris:

It might be because there's so many people on the channel right now. I'm going to take myself off.

Jeff:

[crosstalk 00:00:11], Brian.

Richard Harris:

I'm going to take myself off live when we start going, so hopefully that will improve the quality.

Ryan O'Hara:

Look at Rishi, he's trying to sass people away from the camera.

Richard Harris:

He's trying to get the focus, right now.

Ryan O'Hara:

I know. You know what stinks about... he's probably got the same problem as me.

unknown:

What do you need, Rishi?

Rishi Mathur:

Hello, everyone, hello.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, Rishi.

Richard Harris:

How long do I have?

Ryan O'Hara:

I think we are doing 20 minutes.

Richard Harris:

How long until we start.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, we don't start for another 10 if you want to do something else or mess around.

Richard Harris:

Yes, I do.

Ryan O'Hara:

Okay. Hey, Nick, I'm going to deactivate you for a sec, is that cool?

Nick:

Yeah, go for it.

Ryan O'Hara:

Let's see.

Jeff:

I'll pop out of here later, but I assume you guys are probably okay to introduce yourselves.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, we'll be good.

Jeff:

Okay, so it's recording, if you could just remind people [crosstalk 00:01:11].

Rishi Mathur:

I'm back, how does this look?

Ryan O'Hara:

Good, Jeff was trying to talk to us, Rishi.

Rishi Mathur:

Oh, sorry.

Ryan O'Hara:

Go ahead, what were you saying, Jeff? We respect you.

Jeff:

Well, thank you. I respect that you respect me. I'll let Adam's mom, or [inaudible 00:01:26], whatever his name is. I will let his mom know that you are a respectful bunch. That's my main tie-in to you guys. If you could remind people at the beginning that it is being recorded, just for legality purposes of recording. And then go from there. We'll be on the sidelines, looks like there is a moderator tag if you want. If there's a gap or you are looking for me just use that.

Ryan O'Hara:

All right, I'm just going to write a note down, on Rishi's mail that's at my house.

Rishi Mathur:

Hey, Jeff, I have a quick question for you: I don't think we are able to adjust the volume for videos, or do you know how to do that? Because I was trying to do that all yesterday. Even Vivian couldn't figure it out. I was wondering if you knew how to do that?

Jeff:

Like adjust your input?

Rishi Mathur:

So say we show a video from YouTube, is there any way to adjust the volume? Or do we have to tell our audience, "Hey, lower the volume, because it's about to blast in your ears."?

Jeff:

Oh, I don't see any way you can do that.

Nick:

I tried taking good look through as well and I couldn't find anything that allowed that.

Ryan O'Hara:

We're not going to do it on this anyway, we only do it on the boost probably. If people had questions and stuff, so we will be okay anyway.

Jeff:

Yeah, it's probably because whatever in the app...

Ryan O'Hara:

It's so loud, dude, it blasts through when you play it.

Nick:

Rishi and I were trying some stuff the other day and we found that there are some YouTube videos that were fine, but the one that you were playing, oh my God, that was so loud.

Ryan O'Hara:

Dude, the Vito video is legit. Anyway, that's cool. What were we talking about while we were waiting? So, Rishi, we are going to talk with Richard about sales coaching and stuff. I want to make sure that you ask some questions.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, I think the chat goes to everybody, do you feel good?

Rishi Mathur:

Do I feel good about what?

Ryan O'Hara:

Do you feel good about chatting and stuff, like you're going to be good?

Nick:

There's a moderator chat too.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah, if I'm just moderating chat, I'm good.

Ryan O'Hara:

No, no, I know. We can be like, "Yo, this is interactive, you can ask some questions". Rishi is only going to pick questions of people that give him some money though, you've got to send him some Dogecoins.

Rishi Mathur:

Okay.

Ryan O'Hara:

Does that sound good?

Nick:

Is that still a thing? Are they still doing those?

Ryan O'Hara:

No, I don't think so. I don't think so. Remember that though, Dogecoin? We're bringing it back.

Rishi Mathur:

But why? Why are you bringing it back?

Ryan O'Hara:

I'm going blue suit coat, you're already wearing a gray suit coat, you ruined it.

Rishi Mathur:

It's not gray, are you colorblind? This isn't gray, does anyone else think this is gray? Does this look gray?

Nick:

I can't tell, you're too pixelated.

Rishi Mathur:

I'm pixelated too?

Nick:

I think that's because there are five people in the chat right now. I think once I [crosstalk 00:04:29].

Ryan O'Hara:

Wow, look at that power. Look at this power suit.

Rishi Mathur:

Everyone looks pixelated to me, except for me, so I thought I wasn't pixelated. So, it looks like I am pixelated.

Ryan O'Hara:

It actually looks like everyone is pixelated.

Nick:

Yeah, I think once I drop off and it is just four people on there it's going to be a bit... the quality is going to improve.

Ryan O'Hara:

Jeff is going to drop off too though.

Nick:

All right, well I'm at least going to un-live myself. I don't have a logo or anything.

Rishi Mathur:

Hey, that's better.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, if you're not... wait, you're still live, Nick.

Nick:

Yeah, Jeff did that.

Ryan O'Hara:

No, no, you're still live.

Nick:

Oh, do I need to drop off now?

Rishi Mathur:

No, Jeff came off live, you're still live, Nick.

Nick:

Yeah, I know.

Jeff:

Yeah, looks like having that many videos or people on it...

Nick:

... is what's pixelating it, yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

They can't handle how good looking our cameras are, Rishi.

Rishi Mathur:

That's why I go with the cheap cameras.

Ryan O'Hara:

That's right, dude. That's why they pay you the big bucks.

Rishi Mathur:

So, wait, hold on. You want me moderating chat? Are you going to want me to do anything other than that?

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, just interact, participate.

Rishi Mathur:

Okay, I'll talk to... I forgot where I was going with that, so anyways.

Ryan O'Hara:

Be curious, ask the hard-hitting questions.

Nick:

[inaudible 00:05:44] for me, Ryan, because I feel like I'm not doing too much on this call.

Rishi Mathur:

Is Ryan's head cut off? Or is that just from my end?

Nick:

It might be on your end, it looks fine on this end.

Ryan O'Hara:

Wait, why is it cut off?

Rishi Mathur:

I can only see from hair down.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, you know what I do, Rishi? Can you full screen?

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

I will kill my video and restart it, maybe that will help.

Nick:

It's perfect on my end.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah, I can see your head now.

Ryan O'Hara:

I would recommend full-screening this stuff. We start when? 10 minutes, five minutes?

Rishi Mathur:

It's supposed to 13:30 to 13:50 from us.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, we've got 15 minutes, we're good.

Nick:

Right, Ryan, what do you need from me on my end? Because I feel like I'm not going to be able to do too much.

Ryan O'Hara:

I don't know, I thought you were just hanging out in case something breaks.

Nick:

Well, I will hang out at least. I don't know if there is much I can do if something breaks though. I don't know if I have that much control over the platform.

Rishi Mathur:

You actually have no control.

Nick:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

You know what, Nick? You want to get out of here, is that what this is?

Nick:

No, no, I don't mind hanging out, I just didn't know if there was something that you wanted me to do specifically. Right now I'm just rendering stuff on my computer so there is not much I can do anyway, so you're stuck with me.

Ryan O'Hara:

You know what, Nick, I'm un-living you, you make me sick. Can we still hear you from the grave?

Rishi Mathur:

Nope.

Ryan O'Hara:

Wow, that's powerful. That's some power right there.

Rishi Mathur:

Wait, hold on Nick, what happened to your B2B logo? Did they never put it up?

Nick:

I guess not. I had thought [crosstalk 00:07:17].

Ryan O'Hara:

Can you go to your visible profile and you can change your headshot.

Nick:

How do I even get to my profile? I thought I had to have a login to do that?

Ryan O'Hara:

You have a login, because you're here.

Nick:

I don't have a login, I have a link that I click to get here.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh my God. Excuses, excuses, excuses. What am I supposed to do? Are we doing gallery view, or do you want to do it where it only shown one person at once?

Nick:

So, my question is... we're not posting this, right? This is getting posted by someone else?

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, it is being hosted and everything by the conference we're doing.

Nick:

But are we posting this ourselves? Are we editing it and posting it?

Ryan O'Hara:

No.

Nick:

Then it doesn't matter what we're doing then.

Ryan O'Hara:

We gave Richard the pleasure of being in front of a bigger audience than our normal audience. I hope you enjoy that, Richard.

Nick:

If I was editing this I would say gallery view, but it doesn't matter if we are not editing it ourselves or doing anything.

Ryan O'Hara:

Cool, I've got a [inaudible 00:08:14] in the cellar, that will do it.

Richard Harris:

Ryan, since you're the late night host, who's the band?

Rishi Mathur:

It's me.

Richard Harris:

You getting Roots to show up?

Nick:

I think Ryan is also the band, he's got the keytar in the background.

Rishi Mathur:

Ryan is just a keytar [inaudible 00:08:29].

Nick:

Oh my God, I'm muting Ryan.

Richard Harris:

You can have my kid come on and play piano if you want.

Rishi Mathur:

Oh, for real? Let's do that. He's not going to know he's muted, don't tell him he's muted.

Richard Harris:

Hey, question, so we're doing this for 20 minutes? Then do I go to my [inaudible 00:08:58] or my virtual room or booths or whatever?

Ryan O'Hara:

So, we are doing this for 20 minutes. And then we have from... what time zone are you in Richard? You're West Coast, right?

Richard Harris:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

From 11:30 to 12:30 your team, we have a booth and we are just going to continue talking and let people ask questions for you. There will probably be some stuff with showing people how LeadIQ works and stuff too.

Richard Harris:

How do I get to my booth?

Ryan O'Hara:

So, there is going to be second link that will be sent out to you to join the booth.

Richard Harris:

Got it. Okay, so I don't have it. I'm making sure, I just want to make sure.

Ryan O'Hara:

They actually were meant to send it. Hey, Jeff, can you hear us? Could you make sure Richard gets invited to our booth?

Jeff:

Yeah, did you not get a second link yet?

Richard Harris:

I have no idea, dude.

Ryan O'Hara:

Okay, there will be two emails, both from registration at Bizzabo.com, and one link if for this, one link is for the booth.

Rishi Mathur:

It's Bizzabo.

Ryan O'Hara:

Well, not all of us, Rishi, know how to read, okay? Anyway.

Rishi Mathur:

Just clarification.

Jeff:

Has it showed up, yet? I will go have Vivian resend you one.

Richard Harris:

I'm sure it's here and I just don't see it. And the sad is I'm an inbox-zero guy which means it probably came and I deleted it, because I didn't see that I really needed it.

Ryan O'Hara:

Richard, are you registered for the event?

Richard Harris:

Pretty sure I [inaudible 00:10:27] you know? Come on.

Ryan O'Hara:

Well, if you are you could also just find the booth in the event app on the computer, and then join it that way too. And we will just promote you to speaker, if you can't find the link. I'm sure they can resend you a link though, right Jeff?

Jeff:

Yeah, I'll have Vivian rerun that.

Richard Harris:

Thank you.

Ryan O'Hara:

How are things going so far? Are you feeling good? Oh, I guess he left so I can't hear his answer. Has it been good?

Jeff:

Just wanted to be here with video not grainy. Yeah, impressive participation for a virtual hub for sure.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, awesome. Cool.

Richard Harris:

That's exciting.

Nick:

So, Ryan, we're not posting this under B2B? This will just on live show and that's the end?

Ryan O'Hara:

It is a B2B Tonight set, it's just presented by Tenbound. They're doing it, not us.

Nick:

Right, but are we posting it online?

Ryan O'Hara:

No.

Nick:

Are we going to...

Ryan O'Hara:

No, you're not touching this at all. No, you don't have to do anything.

Nick:

That's just what I wanted to confirm. Okay, all right.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, they own the rights for this. It's like the NFL, you watch this and they're like, "You can't use this footage."

Richard Harris:

Who owns the rights?

Ryan O'Hara:

Technically, this is Tenbound's thing. We're just doing a panel and stuff.

Rishi Mathur:

Guest hosts.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah we are guest hosting this thing. Normally we do a B2B Tonight set, it's an hour long and we are hosting it from LeadIQ, but we're doing it just for Tenbound, for tonight.

Nick:

Cool, so I guess... Sorry, I was totally talking don't mind me.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, Nick, by the way you don't have your webcam hooked up. Can't use virtual cameras? It doesn't work. Just curious, because it's not Zoom. So, Richard, I figured what we are going to talk about mainly is we're going to dig into a lot of the stuff during one on ones, and I know you have a lot of cool stuff to write there, or say there. The question track is, basically we are going to ask you how to coach yourself for one on ones and how it is different from a pipeline interview. What to look for to improve your team? What makes a great one on one meeting? At that point we will probably run out of time and transfer to booth.

Ryan O'Hara:

We are going to do something else. When we get to the booth, more of the questions are going to be more about sales leadership and how to lead a team. I forgot to ask Scott Lease if he wanted to do it, maybe I will ping him right now and see if he wants to crash, but it might be too last minute.

Richard Harris:

It's all right.

Ryan O'Hara:

Okay, you're fine. You're great.

Richard Harris:

I am.

Ryan O'Hara:

You have the zen-like quality that I think we all desire to have some day. How's everything going for you though, have you been impacted at all by the pandemic and stuff with training?

Richard Harris:

Yeah, it's really interesting, April was the re-onboarding process for everybody, right? So you had to re-onboard people to work from home. You had to re-onboard your budget. You had to re-onboard your product market fit. And then starting late April, May people started inquiring again. And right now the early adopters, you still got to be paying this year. So, I literally have three or four contracts that are today, tomorrow stuff. So, it is actually going to turn into something very interesting, because normally my training was [inaudible 00:13:54] on Monday, train on Tuesday, fly home on Wednesday.

Richard Harris:

Now, I don't have to fly anywhere. I do these two hour sessions four days in a row. So, I can actually do three clients Monday through Thursday. 08:00 to 10:00, 10:30 to 12:30, 13:00 to 15:00, and I do that three days in a row. I can now, capacity wise, do 3x in a week what I used to be able to. And I never have to get on an airplane. So, I'm interested to see how this continues to play out. I actually think I could end up making more money.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, you have more inventory slots because you're not traveling any more. Do you feel like it's harder to get people engaged online versus if you were doing it in person.

Richard Harris:

I used to. I've done two hour sessions before, I think the easiest part is that people are now used to it, more than they used to be. And the fact that I did my live training back in May and had 500 people sit for three hours while I went through my training, tells me that they will do it if they are interested. Which I am doing again next week, I'm doing my live training and I think we have about 400 registrants already for it. So, they will sit for 08:00 to 11:00 Pacific Time for three hours and listen to me talk. Can't complain. [inaudible 00:15:25] has changed.

Ryan O'Hara:

Are you going to be doing...? So, like for us, what we basically have done is I have shifted away our webinar strategy so that, there's two things we are doing and I actually think John Barrows' team has been doing this too actually, talking with them. Right now we're shifting where... if you're on our email list, we just email you a Zoom link and track who clicks it. Instead of having to re-register for stuff when we do live stuff. We just notify people we are doing something live in 15 minutes. And that's how we have been getting to B2B Tonight. And then we are doing sign ups obviously too, because we will promote whatever is happening. So, we pushed people to the conference this week for you, for this talk. Instead of pushing to LeadIQ we pushed to them, but normally what we would be doing is pushing you to the landing page, have you phone on and stuff.

Ryan O'Hara:

What's cool for us, it allows us to repurpose stuff too. We used to just do a bit or something on LinkedIn and post it as a video. Now we will do the bit as part of the show. We're not doing it to make it last 20 minutes, but normally we would make a video that is comedic and fun, while educational involving sales. And then we would do that bit and we would use that to promote people to the webinar and then just do the webinar. Now, we are putting them together, which has been fun.

Richard Harris:

Yap. So, I don't know if you're telling me or asking me a question?

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, I was just telling you what we are doing. I was just curious.

Richard Harris:

Yeah, strategies have definitely shifted. I'm figuring out some stuff around that too. It's sort of a UFO.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, it's been crazy. I think the capacity thing is interesting, doing the training remotely, it also... the hardest part is probably getting everyone to interact compared to being in a room, right?

Richard Harris:

No, it's not, you would bee surprised.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, good. That's awesome.

Richard Harris:

But I also think that's how my training is, it's no less interactive than it was when I was in front of people live.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah.

Richard Harris:

So, I think some of it has to do with the presenter.

Ryan O'Hara:

Are you doing it where they're all just in a normal Zoom? Or is it a webinar type thing?

Richard Harris:

No, it's a Zoom meeting. I don't do webinars because I want them to interact.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, that's awesome.

Rishi Mathur:

How do you create it so that people do interact or feel comfortable to interact? On a Zoom or something like that?

Richard Harris:

So, for me, I specifically explain a theory and then I go, "Great, who does this? Someone volunteer. Come on. Somebody jump in." And somebody usually does. If not, I'll just sit and wait until somebody does. I make them very uncomfortable. I'm not going on until someone talks, literally.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, guys, just so you know, people are coming in now. In three minutes we will start, just to give you a heads up.

Richard Harris:

Whenever you're ready.

Ryan O'Hara:

That's cool.

Richard Harris:

So, I do that. I also have exercises, hey, let's do this, by the way I'm going to pause. Who here has tried this? Who wants to talk about this? Who wants to role play this with me? And because it's a training session they are much more eager to role play, particularly the younger generation, particularly the millennials and the Gen-Z, because that's just the world they live in. It's made them. It's made up to them to get on the phone, play a game and talk with their friends. For Gen-X, that still feels cumbersome.

Ryan O'Hara:

I used to love, when I was at BDR, we used to do a lot of spin. That's what we learnt back then. It was mid 2000s. I used to really like role playing, a lot of people are nervous to do stuff and I always like being called on for it. I don't know why.

Richard Harris:

[crosstalk 00:19:06] class too.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, I don't know if I'm the over-achieving jerk, but I get called on for something, I'm going to come in and attack this.

Richard Harris:

I wasn't over-achieving from a grade perspective, but I certainly liked to volunteer.

Ryan O'Hara:

I think I just like the [inaudible 00:19:22].

Richard Harris:

That's what I mean, I like the adventure.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, the cool part is you do a role play and people see it and they're like, "Oh man, shit, I want to get in on that and do that too." It's a really fun thing to do. Who did I talk to recently about role playing? I talked to someone on my podcast about role playing and they were talking about how people are too friendly. Not friendly, but they make it too easy when they are doing role plays, because you are in front of people. It actually makes it more fun if you can figure out a way to get through a challenge. When I'm the prospect in the role play, I like get into character. I'm like, "Crap, my wife doesn't like me. I have problems with my dad."

Richard Harris:

So my rule is, once we start the role play, you can't break it. You can't break the law. And so that forces people to own it a bit more.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, it looks like we are getting people in. For people that are joining: What's up everybody? I am Ryan O'Hara. Over here on the left is Rishi Mathur. I don't know if he is on the left for everybody, he's on my left. What's up Rishi?

Rishi Mathur:

What's up. You're on my right, so yeah, you're I'm on your left.

Ryan O'Hara:

Okay. And below us is a man who, in his bio it should say that he has run into buildings and saved kittens when the building was on fire, it would be really weird if the building wasn't on fire. He runs an amazing training company that helps people in sales development, leadership. I have been a long follower of his for a long time. At LeadIQ we have been doing this thing since the pandemic started called B2B Tonight, it's normally late night talk show format where Rishi and I will do a comedy bit, we interview someone and ask them stuff. Because we only have 20 minutes today we are going to jump right into the interview with Richard.

Richard Harris:

It won't be funny at all.

Ryan O'Hara:

No, absolutely not. In fact, the big bit for today, the shortest bit we've ever done, is having Rishi in this meeting in the first place. Look at his hair. What are you doing, Rishi? What happened.

Rishi Mathur:

It's the same hair that you have just a different color, all right?

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, listen, I have the hair of a teen...

Richard Harris:

Can we shut up about hair?

Ryan O'Hara:

I have the hair of a teen idol, what do you have? Hey, Richard, you look great with a hat okay? Don't be down on yourself.

Rishi Mathur:

You look fantastic. You look like a director. You like somebody in power, in charge. He looks like a muppet.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, anyway, what we want to do today, let's get to the business as the kids call it, we're going to talk today specifically, today during this talk, about one on one coaching sessions. Because a lot of you that are out there are managers or people that want to be managers one day and figure out how you should be coaching your reps one on one. Richard is really passionate about this topic and I think it is really great. Here's the other cool part: Later on today at the LeadIQ booth we are just going to continue doing an interview and you can come in and ask questions about managing stuff. You can participate in chat. You can ask questions here, but it's going to be a little bit limited and focused on one on ones.

Ryan O'Hara:

Later on we are going to talk about all things under the sun with sales leadership, if you want to ask some questions. If you want to see what our product does too, you can hang out there and we will show you some stuff too. So, let's jump into it Richard. Let's start with the foundation here, let's talk about what is the best way to deal with a one on one? How do you approach it in the first place? You're doing a weekly one on one with people that report to you.

Richard Harris:

So, one is they to be... you have to commit to them 100%. If you're doing Mondays is one on one or Tuesdays, or certain people each day you cannot change those. They are set in stone, because if you don't you're basically telling your rep that their time is not valuable. And you work, this is the one place in sales, as a leader your reps time is always more valuable than your time. Always. So, what I encourage people to do, if I'm a sales manager or an STR leader, or even a VP of sales, I tell my executive team, hey, these are my one on one times, I will not move them. The building can be on fire and I will not move them.

Richard Harris:

Particularly in a remote world, because CEOs love to say, "Hey, I just need you for five minutes" and "We've got to do this for the board." The board has got to wait. The CEO has got to wait. And as a sales leader, the beautiful thing about being a sales leader is that you can easily say, look the best thing I can do for all of us to make more money is to spend time with my team. Those are my one on ones and I will not move them. Period. So, that's the first thing that I would encourage people to think about and own that shit in a militant way.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, people blow off one on ones all the time. They do stuff that's short, don't do that! Rishi, by the way I'm sorry I canceled our one on one today, we do this by the way, I'm sorry.

Rishi Mathur:

Three times.

Ryan O'Hara:

Listen that doesn't matter, okay. But serious;y, I think I am guilty of this too.

Richard Harris:

We all are.

Ryan O'Hara:

I will just be crammed with stuff and throw it out. In a remote time like now too, we are all isolated and you're not getting that normal drive-by conversation with your manager, so one on ones are even more important today.

Richard Harris:

Yes. Yes.

Ryan O'Hara:

When we get a prep call for this, I literally changed and stapled... I haven't move a one on one since you that, because I was like "Oh, man I really need to do that." So, what's the difference between a one on one and doing a pipeline review. I think a lot of people that are here, they are managing sales reps and stuff, thinking about who you're going after, your target accounts, all that stuff. What do you do? What's the difference?

Richard Harris:

Well, there's a couple of ways that I would tell you to structure your one on ones, before we get into that. So, one is: Sometimes you have one on ones that are weekly, sometimes you have them that are bi-weekly. Some reps, your new reps, might get them weekly. They might even get two a week. Often times in the office environment one of those was a drive-by, as you alluded to. Your veteran reps may not need or want one every week. I think you make it available and you say look, it's up to you as my veteran rep, if someone comes along and says they need to have a sales call, blow off my one on one unless you want me there. I'm happy to join you on a sales call.

Richard Harris:

So, one make sure you understand the weekly, bi-weekly, those kinds of things. At least twice a month. Once a month is not good enough. Sorry, field reps, doesn't work. Pipeline, we do not talk about deals in a one on one. We don't. We do not talk about deals. You can talk about challenges as a whole. Hey, of your three best deals, what is the consistent challenge you're having? Is it around negotiation? Is it around asking for next steps? Stay out of the weeds, but then it becomes... that's the coaching moment. So, try to find a theme for it.

Richard Harris:

There are structures of 10 minutes for the rep, 10 minutes for you, 10 minutes about the week ahead. Sometimes it's 15 minutes. I don't think one on ones need to be an hour. I try to make them 30 minutes, because you need to go fast and quick otherwise your both just sitting there listening to yourself talk about how wonderful you think you are. Which of course we are, but we need to control ourselves. So, defining what that looks like. If you've got weekly one on ones, one weekly can be about coaching and stuff, another week could be about career pathing, maybe a book they're reading, you're trying to coach them on that. Maybe a third week of one on ones you can talk about a couple of pipeline things, maybe if it's the end of the month.

Richard Harris:

You can do those things, but I don't want you getting into the weeds of deals in a one on one. So, for me, it's about professional development. It's about answering their questions. It's about getting their ideas. What do you think we need as an organization? This is their time. And as a manager or a leader, your job is to really just go, "That's interesting, let me make a note of that. I don't know if we are going to do it, but that was interesting." So, hey Michael, hey Ryan, why do you think we need that? That's what a one on one is for me. It's much more personal. One on ones can also be about what's going on in your life. How are you? What can I do to help you? What are your aspirations? In the next six months what do you want to accomplish in your life, and what can work do to help you affect that?

Richard Harris:

You want to take a vacation, you're planning for Christmas. What can I do to make your Christmas or holiday season, I'm Jewish so Hanukkah, whatever your religion is, what can I do at your job to make sure you have that amazing moment with your family? That is a one on one. In my opinion.

Ryan O'Hara:

Do you ever talk about your relationship with your employee as a manager? Like, "Hey, do I suck? What can I do to be better?" Is that part of that too?

Richard Harris:

Yeah, I think so. I encourage people to research that, because it's a very personal thing. You're talking about combining discomfort, uncomfortable conversations and some level of change management within yourself as a human. So, I think you have to do a little bit of Googling about self-improvement with your team, got to figure out what team culture means and what makes a good team culture leader, so that then when you ask your team that question you can formulate it in a better way. One, so they feel comfortable saying it, but two, so you feel comfortable being able to disassociate enough that you can hear it. That's the hard part, but yes, I do think people should do that. In a heartbeat.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, I know from my personal experience when I was at BDR back in the day, they didn't really have the STR term I don't think back then. I remember I used to go into one on one meetings and a lot of the time I would go into the weeds of this is an account I'm trying to break into as a prospector. And you're saying that's actually not necessarily the right thing to do?

Richard Harris:

Right.

Ryan O'Hara:

I think a lot of people also don't do enough with... you go into the meetings and the other thing that could be fun that will really inspire action, especially in prospecting for instance, a lot of people in this conference are here for prospecting, you could go to these meetings to brainstorm some creative ideas to break into accounts too. It doesn't have to be a specific account, it could just be fundamental principles. Maybe it's, Hey, what are some cool ideas we could do for a video this week? Let's run through some stuff."

Ryan O'Hara:

One thing I don't think managers do enough of is, I try to tell managers to do a talent audit, because no-one ever grows up and says, Boy, I can't wait to work in sales" that doesn't happen. People usually accidentally fall into a sales job, especially in the sales development world where you're just getting a foot in the door, but that's the piece.

Richard Harris:

I think there's... and I love this idea Ryan, you can run themes. You could say, "Hey everybody, for this weeks one on one I want you to bring me your craziest idea." I don't care if it's a [crosstalk 00:30:08]

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, I love that. I love that.

Richard Harris:

And say hey, we're going to go through them in one on ones, but then we might take them and do them in a team session. So, I think there are lots of ways to do that. There are a couple of questions coming in, I want to answer some of those.

Rishi Mathur:

Right, so Freddy... you want me to ask it, or you guys just want to read it like that?

Richard Harris:

I'll read it out, I'll take care of it. I do this all the time, so sit back, relax, enjoy yourself over there.

Rishi Mathur:

Rishi, just get out of this meeting. You're out.

Richard Harris:

How do you approach one on ones... how would you approach one on ones, a newly onboarded STR during ramp looking at things like motivation, correcting poor habits early? So, the first thing I would say is, hopefully as the leader and if you're a new leader this I something I hope you will learn, is that you have to try and interview for those things ahead of time. Hey, what poor habits do you think you might have that I could help you with. You could ask them on how do you like to be coached? Some people think coaching is micro-managing. My generation did. Don't sit there and tell me how to have a better phone call. Eff you, I'm a Gen-X'er. I had to walk home at the age of 11, fix myself a snack and wait for my mom to get home at five and you're going to sit here and tell me how to make a effing phone call? How dare you? That was my attitude.

Richard Harris:

So, one is looking at it in the hiring process in the first place. The second thing was just to point it out. And I do this with my son a lot, if he gets upset with something I have to say to him, "Hey, you're allowed to be upset, you can cry, you can be upset, you're allowed to feel angry. You can feel whatever you want, the behavior is what I want to talk about though, I want to help you so that you understand a better behavior." Now, I wouldn't say it that way to an SDR, that's a little patronizing, but it's the same approach. Hey, I've noted some things and I want to give you some ideas. And I want to brainstorm with you. I've noticed these as things that are of concern, one do you think that they're a concern? And whether you do or you don't, what do you think you would want to change if we wanted to change it?

Richard Harris:

So, to a certain extent management is about asking open-ended questions. What do you think we should do? How should we do it? How much advice do you want?

Ryan O'Hara:

That almost makes them have buy-in to whatever advice you're giving because they're the one who came up with the idea, even though 'cough cough' we all know that you had the idea somewhere.

Richard Harris:

Yeah, totally, right? And it's a different approach than the dictatorial way. So, when you say, "Hey, how do you like to be managed, Ryan? I'm your manager." I could say, "Ryan, do you want me to just walk in and tell you what to do and be gone? Or do you want to sit down and try to figure it out together." Because I will try to work within the way that you like to learn. And just by saying that, it doesn't mean you're not going to sometimes dictate and it doesn't mean that sometime you aren't going to do the other. But at least you are showing this approach of I want to do what works for you.

Richard Harris:

Which buys trust, it buys loyalty, it buys the affordability for each other to work together, it builds a stronger culture. By asking the open-ended questions, you're actually getting them to solve their own problems, but you're coaching in accountability. That's how you coach in, "Hey, don't come to me with just a problem, come with solutions," which is a terrible thing to say. But build it often and early in those roles. So, motivation, I think you have to ask how do you like to be motivated? Do you want a swift kick in the pants, like a football coach? Do you need me to say, "Hey, I think there's something missing here? Do you want help or can you figure it out on your own?" You have to ask people how they want to be motivated.

Ryan O'Hara:

Richard, can I ask a follow up for that on the new hires? When you have a new hire that a company that you might be training and working with, what are you looking for when you're a coach? What are you listening for? What are looking for to see this person might need help? How do you find the problems that you can go to the one on ones with?

Richard Harris:

Well, I think that's also part of your one on one. Someone even said, "Do you have a preset agenda?" Yes, and no. Your preset agenda is 10 minutes for me, 10 minutes for you and 10 minutes about whatever we want to do. One thing I want to know every time we have our conversation though is, what is the one thing you improved on this week? And what is the one thing you want to improve on next week?

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, that's good.

Richard Harris:

Right? And that way there is some accountability, because in some cases you do know what they need to improve on, so you want to see what their self awareness is like. And I know I'm giving you these different jedi mind trick kind of things, I don't want anybody to walk out of here thinking, "Oh. I can manipulate my team by asking these questions." Your job is not to manipulate them, your job is to educate them. Your job is to help them. And you can even say in your team meeting, "Hey guys, we're going to start one on one. Next week I'm going to start a little bit of a different structure. I'm going to start asking more open-ended questions because I want to see where we are with self-awareness. I want to see where we are with self-accountability. I want to see where we are in terms of creating a culture of learning from each other."

Richard Harris:

So, now you're telling them this shift is going to occur, so then it doesn't feel manipulative. So, those are the ways I would encourage you to think about doing things.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, I do want to tell everyone by the way [inaudible 00:35:38] in case you are not reading the chat, we are going to have this on demand as a recording after. It will be part of the conference package when you come back in. Log in and you can see it, but there will be information about watching the recording afterwards. Richard-

Rishi Mathur:

We have five minutes left, FYI.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, okay, thanks Rishi.

Rishi Mathur:

You're welcome.

Ryan O'Hara:

One thing I wanted to ask you, Richard, we're talking about one on ones, we're talking about going through... I think that thing that you're making that's a really good point is that, I say this in prospecting all the time, "What works for one rep, might not work for another rep with selling." The same thing works with managing, right? You have to tailor your managing and your coaching based on whoever that rep is. From your experience, what are some different styles that work? You mentioned that micro-managing is one of them. If you're not micro-managing are you ever going into a one on one and just prospecting with the rep you're working with, doing stuff with them that's really hands on and just doing practice runs together? Or is that a different type of meeting?

Richard Harris:

No, I think that's great. Again, it could be, hey this week... and you can even do this thematically, "Hey everybody, when you come into the one on ones this week for my 10 minutes we are going to role play open-ended questions." So, in that case you could say, "Hey, bring me one or two clients you are going in to, let's assume you get to that conversation. What questions do you want to ask? And let's role play it." To some that might feel micro-managing, to others it might feel coaching. I don't know.

Richard Harris:

You can definitely do those types of things and build this theme of what we're doing. Maybe it's cold call scripting this week. Yeah, I know you're an expert cold caller, I want to hear you do it again. If someone is the expert cold caller, you know what you do? You become the grumpy Gus who answers the phone, "Yeah, what do you want? I don't want it!" Assume the role. Assume it in the worst possible way to push that person to get better. And here's my rule about role playing, whether it's in a team setting or in a one on one, you don't break the role play. Period.

Richard Harris:

If Ryan and I are role playing, Ryan can't stop and say, "Let me start over", no there's no starting over, keep going. Just go through it. Because you don't get to start over in real life. And if we are going to have those mistakes, I would rather have them in the role play so we can do another role play when it's over. I want Ryan in that moment to be uncomfortable and want to start over, because at some point that same level of discomfort will occur in real life and it may not be the same part of the role play, but I want him to realize, "Oh, shit, I can't stop I've got to keep going forward." How do I encourage Ryan to think through the problem and work the solution. Work the problem.

Ryan O'Hara:

I think... By the way, last call for questions if people want to ask anything for you, because we have got a couple of minutes left. I think another thing you could do also is, if you're on one of those teams that uses some sort of call recording software or something where you're listening to the cold calls. Maybe you're using one of those sales engagement platforms. I would highly recommend, if you're a manager, listen to some of those calls and write down things to set it up for mock calls. And you should just be reading verbatim the things that actually get said on calls. Because sometimes- Oh, go ahead sorry.

Richard Harris:

I think that's a great idea, but... And this is a debatable thing, because it goes is it your time or their time? Do I tell Ryan, "Hey, you go listen to that call and tell me what you think you could do better." I'm going to listen to it too and let's compare notes.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, that's a good idea.

Richard Harris:

Yeah, that's a fun one on one I think, because it drives self-awareness. You're not trying to embarrass anybody, you're not doing it in front of a team, although sometimes, not from an embarrassment perspective, but in a team environment it is encouraging to do that, because then the team can give coaching versus the manager. If you've got that great culture. So, that is my thought around that. I love that idea though, Ryan.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, I think a lot of the time you hear people do these role play stuff during one on ones and they're too... It's too easy. It's either too easy or a prospect would never say that, it's because you work at this company that you're saying it. For example, when you're the rep or you're the manager and you're going in doing a role play, you already know the space [inaudible 00:39:56].

Richard Harris:

Hey, Ryan, stop. Cold call me right now. Hello.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, is this Richard.

Richard Harris:

This is.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, Richard, what am I selling, I've got think-

Richard Harris:

No, no sale today. Start over.

Ryan O'Hara:

Okay, okay.

Richard Harris:

Hello.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, Richard. How is it going?

Richard Harris:

Good, how are you? Who's calling?

Ryan O'Hara:

This is Ryan from LeadIQ. I actually was looking at your LinkedIn I saw you were doing some sales training stuff and I was curious, how are you getting people to go to those meetings?

Richard Harris:

Okay, Ryan, stop right there for a second. Do me a favor, stand up. Seriously, stand up.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yap.

Richard Harris:

Ho, you're wearing trousers. No, stand up. Stand up.

Ryan O'Hara:

Okay, people won't be able to see, it's weird.

Richard Harris:

That's okay, guess what? They don't see you on cold calls anyway. Do it again, start over. Hello?

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, is this Richard?

Richard Harris:

This is.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, this is Ryan O'Hara calling from LeadIQ, how's it going?

Richard Harris:

Good, man, how are you?

Ryan O'Hara:

Good. I wanted to ask you something really quick, I only want to take up a little bit of your time. I was curious if you're trying to-

Richard Harris:

Stop right there. So, stop right there. Now you can sit down. Simon says sit down. So, this is what I mean by role playing. By the third time Ryan was standing up. He was a little bit more in his natural spot. His tone changed. His pace changed. I know Ryan well enough to know that Ryan was much calmer by the third one.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, yeah, I was all right by the third one, I was just off guard the first one.

Richard Harris:

Well, that's the point. That's why I did it. That's how I want... If we're talking about role playing, that's how you role play. No, Ryan, can't break role play. And even though I said you can't break it, I made him start over and I repeated it, because part of it is: How do I get Ryan to hyper focus on what he's doing. Hyper focus on how he is doing it, how he is sounding without him even realizing it. So, if I'm doing that in a team environment or a one on one environment. That, to me, is how I would role play something.

Ryan O'Hara:

All right, so we are out of time unfortunately. If people want to hear us do more of this, maybe we could actually have people come to the booth and role play with us.

Richard Harris:

I will gladly role play with anybody in the booth. Let's do it.

Ryan O'Hara:

Come to the booth, if you're a manager come here, you can be part of the action and be part of the prospect. Come to the LeadIQ booth, we will show you some stuff to that we are doing to help people in sales. We will also kick around this stuff.

Richard Harris:

I'll even be bold enough to be the rep.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, I was going to say, I'm fine with that, you'll be fine. We should have Rishi do it too. All right, thank you so much everyone for coming on. We really appreciate it.

Richard Harris:

Thank you everybody, I appreciate it. I look forward to chatting with you at the booth.

Ryan O'Hara:

We will see you at our booth. Yeah, we will see you in a little while. I don't know how to end this session now. I'm going to hit the delete button and hope it works. All right everyone, see you soon.