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Episode 10: Justin Mongroo

B2B Tonight Transcript
[Ryan] All right, so Rishi-

- [Rishi] We are live.

- [Ryan] We somehow are live here. I don't know how this show hasn't got canceled yet. When is May gonna find out? Our CEO.

- Never. I don't think she looks at our content ever. This is why we're still here.

- If she knew that I was putting you on camera she'd be like, "Oh I got to get you. "I got to get you out of here"

- She would definitely question your judgment. I'm questioning your judgment. Everyone's questioning your judgment.

- So we're at 2:00 PM here. We're kinda pouring in. We're gonna give people a second to come in so that they don't think that we're on time cause that's not very stylish to be on time. Is it Rishi?

- No, it's not. Let's give some shout outs. Hello, Joe. How are you?

- Whoa. Joe is pouring in?

- Joking.

- By the way, Rishi, just so you know, I can't see chat. I just wanted to let you know.

- Yeah, yeah. I got--

- So you don't think that I'm a jerk.

- No, I got chat and Q and A cover. Should we just... We'll announce that too.

- Okay. That sounds good. I'm excited. What's new Rishi? How you holding up? I'm doing very well. As you can see I'm very much dressed up from my head to my waist.

- I mean, we don't wanna check the camera below the waist and see what's going on there.

- No, you can check it for sure. It's pajamas.

- This is... I think you're just disappointing people. Every day I'm more and more disappointed by your existence.

- I appreciate that man. That means a lot.

- Now I do have to ask our guests and our people here. Make sure that if you are asking questions and stuff let's keep it cool. Our last webinar- This is a true story. Our last webinar that we did someone started pitching their product in chat and we had to boot them. It was really awkward, wasn't it?

- Cause they know, they were also, they got cold pitch to us cause they thought that this was the time to do it.

- Yeah always. Oh, is that why they were doing that? I thought they were just doing it to like plug their product. I was like, Oh, we can't have that.

- No, it was like rate my pitch. They go, okay. In the chat, this is the perfect time to do a cold pitch.

- Oh my gosh. Dude, I didn't even know that. So welcome everybody to B2B Tonight. If you're not familiar with this show we interview thought provoking, gifted, wonderful guest. Our guest tonight is super super cool. It's not even tonight, but you know what I mean? If I did this thing after hours, you wouldn't come, right? You're probably at home watching Cobra Kai, which I tried to get everybody to watch when it was on YouTube but now people are watching it. Living the dream a little bit. And we know that we're not gonna get you to sit at your computer after hours. So B2B Tonight is happening during the daytime this time. Actually every time pretty much.

- Technically it's a work night.

- It is a work night, isn't it? I mean-

- [Rishi] That's right.

- This is a great experience for people. Today a lot of our show is going to focus on sales process and I'll tell you something. I was talking with Rishi about sales process a little bit this week and I realized something. Rishi doesn't have a process for anything he does.

- Nope.

- One of those things that Rishi definitely doesn't do is Rishi I heard that you're into cooking a little bit and I didn't believe it. I feel like you have no process for cooking.

- You just go in the kitchen and you mix things up. That's how it always works.

- All right. I certainly hope so. Well, let me ask you this for Rishi. I believe last week I challenged you and said that you couldn't cook anything and you said you're going to prove it to me on the show in front of a live audience, right?

- That's correct.

- All right, well...

- So what actually, what I did Ryan is I took that challenge. I took that challenge and I took the bulls by the horn and I took the video of me cooking and made it in one. Like it was just like easy peasy. I sent that video over to Nick and now he just finished editing the video. And Nick's our video editor. Those who don't know, his name's Nick Edgar. He's on this somewhere. And he just said, "Rishi I finally got your video done. Here it is." And are we ready to watch it?

- [Ryan] Let's see what happened. Let's see your venture in cooking before we interview Justin

- Recently Ryan O'Hara told me that I Rishi Mathur couldn't even cook. He says he doesn't believe me. So here's a video proving him and the world wrong. I can cook. And today we're making scrambled eggs. Rishi Style. First we're gonna need a pan. Hey, Sanam. Where the pans? Where? Sanam? So that I got my pan... What? What do you mean not this pan? You'll cut it? All right? Cool. Now that I've got my handy dandy pan, time to cook some scrambled eggs. First tip I learned from Gordon Ramsay. Always make sure the pan is hot. How comes it's not turning on? Sanam how do you turn the stove on? It's making this noise. Is that supposed to happen? Make sure the pan is hot. Let's find out. That's how you tell the pan's hot. Usually you just take water and do something with water. I don't want the pan wet. So now I need to get some oil. Oil. We're gonna... I don't think that's supposed to happen. Put some oil in the pan. I think I may have put, you know what a little bit more. That's fine. You're gonna get it nice and oily. Eggs. Now, we don't eat yolk in his family. Cause some people don't like it. So we're making egg whites. Health. Fit. Do I squeeze on this? How does this open? Okay come. Now that I got the cap off with no help I just throw it in here. Now, if you come close, look at this. It's supposed to look like that. That's the point. It's supposed to look like that because it's where the egg gets its yellowness from. And then you just mix it around. Scrambling it. Scrambling it. Scrambling it.

- [Sanam] Rishi, why'd you use that much oil? It's a nonstick pan.

- It's how you make eggs. Now stop talking because I'm... Decorating. And now every good scrambled egg needs some decorations. I got my chili powder here. Got my turmeric. And now what am gonna do is just. Kong! Kong! kong! Kong! Kong! Kong! Kong! Kapoow. You just mix that up again.

- [Sanam] Hey, I think your eggs are burning.

- What? Oh my God. Don't get this part.

- Rishi your eggs are ready.

- No. Good old scrambled eggs made by me. Let's get a good shot of that. Oh, Sanam. I got you some scrambled eggs. Now take a bite of that. Oh, I got to get you a fork. Now take a bite and just say, yum.

- My eggs are great.

- [Rishi] Nope. It's my eggs.

- Your eggs are great.

- [Rishi] Aaw. Thank you. And that's how you make scrambled eggs. Stay hungry. San Francisco.

- You clearly didn't--

- I put it on on mute.

- You clearly didn't cook those eggs. Are you serious?

- I have to talk to Nick This was supposed to be my video of me shining and it's kinda messed up.

- Also you don't live in San Francisco. Why did you say hi to San Francisco there? That's where the other side of ReadIQ is. So May can watch this finally.

- All right. Well, either way, let's get to our guest for a second here. I wanna tell you a little bit about this guy. So originally for this episode we had another guest lined up and they had a conflict and we had to backfill and I panicked for about 24 hours. And this deep from within his soul just a super kind good person came out of nowhere and saved the day for us. I'm really excited to have Justin Mongroo on it. If you don't know who Justin is, Justin works at Slack and runs a Sales Development Business Development team there. He does a ton of stuff with sales process and operations to help people. Before that he's actually been a sales leader at multiple companies, including Conga and Intuit. If you saw my LinkedIn post this week, I talked about one of the things I really appreciate about Justin and his insight is he's actually sold outside of the fake economy. And if you want to be a unicorn in our space, you got to sell outside of tech and he's done it multiple times. We thought who better to have on than Justin Mongroo? Let's say Hi to Justin. Everyone in chat say Hi by the way. Hey Justin. How are you?

- What an award winning background, by the way. It's great.

- Thanks. I figured we were talking about leads, so we try to dig some up but. Make sure we stay on brand at some point here.

- It's great. It's great. So Justin, for people that don't know your background a little bit. How'd you get involved with working at Slack? How did that happen?

- Slack? I was actually like a lot of roles called by some people that had worked with me before and asked if I was interested. At the time I was really happy with the team and the company I was with, but I saw pretty incredible opportunity for the product of Slack and what it can do in the way we communicate.

- We use Slack every day here. Probably everybody in this chat is using something like Slack. Hopefully they are using Slack. If you're not talk to Justin, by the way. Like, what was your first role when you came into Slack? Like what were the big projects that you kind of took on to help with process and stuff?

- Yeah. When I came into Slack, we had a team that had been built up and obviously the group that had built that team did a tremendous job. And the goal was to build more rigor and process and systems to account for the growth that we were experiencing. And how do you manage that type of volume? And so the first thing that I thought we needed to put in place was culture. You can't ask people to run a million miles unless they understand what we're all bought into, unless they know that we're bought into them in their careers as well. So it's about building training to show people we were invested in them.

- That's cool. Oh, before we could... Actually I want to make one quick announcement. If you guys have questions at home or anything you could put in the chat, or there's a Q and A section where you could ask your questions and we'll answer them live on air.

- So what are some things that you did when you were at a Conga and Intuit that you were like, yeah I got do this at Slack. Like these are things that we should just be doing.

- Yeah. I think everything in the past is great to influence and is a good guiding light but if you go to stamp everything the same way you did it before you're gonna miss the opportunity. And so the thing that I brought, I guess, brought with me that Slack has molded is the concept of how do you onboard your team? How do you look at your relationship with marketing and your cross functional partners? How do you think about things from a prioritization perspective and be maniacally focused on prioritization, both in the way you engage with marketing and the leads they send, as well as the way you invest in your people that are ultimately gonna respond to those inputs.

- I feel like a lot of companies in tech, no one thinks about this, but the people that are in tech that sell software where you could self sign up. Cause you could sign up for Slack without talking to anyone right now. How do you guys make sure you're not reactive? Like, what's that process like? So if I'm someone that comes in. I started a new company and I fill out and make a Slack. Like what's the next steps? What happens?

- Yeah. I think it's about balance, right? There's people that are coming to Slack, like you said, on their own. They're aware of our product. They can sign up for free. They can use the trial. And that's certainly a valid signal where we're responsible for making sure they maximize value and are getting what they need to out of the product that will justify a future spend. But there's a whole other group of people that aren't as aware or are aware on some sort of other level. And our job is to really educate them on what Slack does. How it integrates with other products. How we take the whole tech stack and multiply it. And so it's about balancing our calories or our efforts, our activities against both people that already understand, and those that aren't quite as fully aware yet.

- So let's go through a scenario. A target account comes in. Let's pretend that you're trying to sell to a big company. I'm sure you have tons of enterprise customers you can talk about, but give us an enterprise customer you're allowed to talk about, I guess. If you have one.

- We'll just pick any enterprise customer. We work with tons. Their use cases are online. Go check them out.

- Yeah.

- We get a lead from one of our target accounts. Yeah. What's the question?

- Yeah. So what do you do? Like do you have it... I assume you guys do outbound too, but like, do you write that to the person that's been out bounding? Does it go to someone else? Like what's that juggle? Like do you have named accounts?

- Yes, I think there's... So we have target accounts that are named accounts for outbound prospecting and those target accounts have certain level of criteria about what the BDR and the AEEs engagement should be to justify it being a target account. And assuming those come in, those would be worked by the outbound rep. They have the context. They have spoken to other stakeholders and should be able to have really on target messaging for target accounts that are more targets determined by the organization but maybe not yet by a territory and account executive. Those would be handled by an inbound rep. Initial discovery would be done. And usually that's responding to some sort of ABM or targeted marketing outreach.

- So you guys are doing ABM too. How does the sale... What's sales role in the ABM process are you guys supplying marketing with accounts? Who comes up with accounts at Slack?

- Yeah, I'll give them Topo a plug in terms of how I look at ABM, but I've been through a series of their sessions and I'm a firm believer that it's ABM, ABS. It's account based marketing and account based sales and we both are responsible for creating the inputs and feedback loops to drive it together. When it comes to choosing accounts, I think it's twofold. One is you need your AEEs to understand their accounts and what they want you to be working, because obviously if they're not excited, your appointments aren't run with it the way you want them run. But secondarily operations has a strong point. Both MOPs and SOPs in terms of who are our target accounts based on? Industry or TAM or larger regional strategies that we want to drive? So it's twofold. One is at the IC level. The other is at the leadership level.

- There's a question from the audience from sandblast. How would you describe the culture you've worked to mold a Slack?

- I think for me, it's always about coaching and empathy. My leaders and myself all understand that like if we're not willing to do the work or lead by example we have no reason teaching it. And so I think the culture for us is very much we say smart, humble, hardworking, collaborative. Those are buzzwords to many. I think for us. Right. But let's be real. For us, I always say, I can teach you how to do a lot of things, but if you're not willing to do things it's gonna be really hard for it to be meaningful. And so what I always say is if you own the wheel set we'll own the skillset. And the culture is very much that. I hold my team, my managers accountable for creating the skills that our team will need this to win, and I expect our team to execute those skills and be focused on their own improvement and development.

- Does Slack kind of try and set up metrics of... So there's a culture internally, obviously, of how people work, but there's also a culture of interacting with customers and stuff. I, for one, have never been on a sales call with Slack. I wasn't involved with our decision making process when we went with Slack but when a rep's working, like, how do you guys come across this, like, is it more consultative? Are you doing challenger sales stuff? Like what's the framework that you try to do to be helpful for customers?

- No, I definitely would say we lead with empathy. Slack is a product where the value is inherent and it's about understanding that business. What it is that they do. I mean there's tons of consultative trainings, but where were they? Where are they? And where do they need to be? And how to Slack fit into that picture? Both in processes between cross functional groups, external groups. So how do they collaborate and interact in their business unit? One thing I would say is slack's unique, and that in the past, when I was at Intuit, we sold to accountants. We sold the financial people, at Cango we sold to legal people or heads of IT. At Slack you can sell to the head of any department but that means that your discovery is critical because every department in whom they work with inside and outside the organization differs and so do really the consultative sales critical at Slack.

- Rishi, you want to ask that a hard hitting question? It's pretty good.

- Oh, good. I want hard hitting ones. Good.

- There's anonymous attendeance. What are top inbound and outbound channels?

- What are top inbound and outbound channels? Inbound, I would say right now, I really am a fan of our web chat tool and I'll give them a plug. Everyone probably knows about Drift, but big fan of Drift and how they've been working with us.

- Great integration by the way too,. For both companies. Like the integration with Drift. And Slack is amazing.

- Yep, absolutely. So and that has helped us with velocity for people that are on our websites. I always joke with my team. A website's kind of like a store down a mall hallway. No one stops to look at a website that they're completely uninterested in and so we might as well welcome them into the store and ask what was in the window that they liked. So Drift is great. The other inbound channels are certainly our events. We just had our frontiers event. Obviously people that are interested in learning more about Slack and how we work with other organizations is typically a pretty good signal. Outbound. I would say we have a lot of industries that have shown benefits. SAS is pretty straightforward but FIN, SERV, GOV, EDU, manufacturing, hospitality when hospitality is booming. But yeah, I think we use industry signals for our outbound strategy and persona based outreach.

- Justin, I got one quick question. What is your philosophy on building an optimized sales team?

- From the ground up? I think building an optimized sales team, first you need to understand what DNA do you want in the organization and building the foundation. The fundamentals. Because I find most sales organizations I've been in, you have your startup team, but in three to five years, that team is something you've built. And so to that extent, what career paths are you building? How are you setting up enablement along the way so that you nurture those people and you build your DNA from within? Starting with SDRs or even interns, or for now for myself, I'm doing outreach to high school students and mentorships in high schools to try to drive that type of talent pool in our company.

- So let's talk a little bit about... let's start with outbound and we'll work our way inbound. Cause a lot of the people that follow and do stuff with ReadIQ are using us for out. Like they use us for outbound for stuff. What's the outbound process like for you? I mean, it's Slack. Everybody you're emailing already knows who you are. Must be kind of weird. Or everybody you cold call is like, "I'm getting cold called by Slack." Like it actually... One of the nice parts... I did some sales training with Google once and I went to their campus and I talked to them and it's one of the weirdest luxuries. You don't think about it. Its the people you reach out to already knowing your brand. That must help a lot with responses, right?

- Yeah. I think actually we try to reach out to people that don't know about us, right? The ones that are aware you're right. We certainly get there. But if we don't know how to change the status quo and introduce Slack to somebody that doesn't know then we're missing a whole large portion of TAM. But the outbound strategy is a hybrid and so one is what percent of your strategic target accounts have a high level of awareness, but what may be lower level of usage. So let's say one department's really adopted Slack and another department has zero team spun up. That would be a target where we probably have good awareness, but low quality of awareness. Meaning they probably don't know about the depths of our integrations. They probably don't know about our line of business use cases and things of that nature. The other part of the outbound strategies though is what industries do we have a hypothesis about that will benefit from Slack that aren't using us today. And how do we think through telling them the stories they would need to for the future?

- Gotcha. There's a question from Pauline. What is your secret for connecting your ABM campaigns all the way down to sales SDRs? And then the second part of that question is, how do you prioritize those lead that come through?

- So we've broken our lead funnel into two categories. One, I'll just call them hand raisers but think your contact sales forms, those highest indicators of signal, and those have your SLA on them. They should be responded to as quickly as possible. You should have close to a 24/7 coverage as you can, et cetera. Then we have a second cohort which I would call score based and score based variety of tools do that. That marketers use. But within that score based, it's thinking of things as like, I call them P1, P2 or P3. But based on the campaign or score or title or industry, how do you prioritize? And so for ABM, that's the way we look at it. Company size, prioritization, and then is it a implicit outreach or more tangential?

- So the, so P1, P3, P3 being prioritism? Is that what the P is?

- Yeah, Priority.

- [Ryan] Yeah.

- Yup.

- And then here's the other crazy part, is like if you could think about what's happened over the past year, you guys probably had a pretty predictable flow of like what was coming in, and then March hits and a bunch of companies that have never been remote before were probably adopting and looking at like I need to get Slack to get my team more remote and mobile and being able to do stuff. Not that you need to be remote by the way, to use Slack. Like, we were using Slack for years without being remote. That must've been difficult to do, right? Like you're getting an influx of leads and having to figure out like, which ones do I service first, right? How did you guys figure that out? Is that just scoring? Or is it something else.

- That was a really hard time. And when we did see a surge, I forget what the percentages were. But in the hundreds of percent increase and it's funny like anytime you have a surge this happens on micro scales all the time. You have an event that you normally don't have that all of a sudden is an influx. You run an ad that like, Holy cow! This really worked. And the reality is your headcount didn't grow commiserate with that increase. And so the prioritization is critical. Otherwise you're like this dog running up the hill and sliding back down. And so first and foremost, this is why I start with culture always. Is I had a group of SDRs that were really committed to the vision, understood the opportunity in front of us and without the right motivation, and without being quite honest they worked extra hours. That was necessary. There was no system, no process. I could have put in place other than happy people, that knew what we were doing, and were inspired by this surge. Secondly, it's about putting some things in place for them to prioritize. So the way we did that first was with our scoring model. They can simply sort by the score and start there. The second variable we used was title to triangulate high title. And then the third priority we used was ACV or existing spin.

- All right, you know, what's weird is I never thought of the problem of you go get like a huge company on, not everybody's using Slack. You have to think about expansion too. When you guys work that, do you treat an account? Let's say you get a, I'm making a example up. Let's pretend you don't ReadIQ but you only got our finance department using this. And we had lots and lots of employees and stuff. What's the play do you have account managers that try and expand the account or do you have STRs that treat it as if it's just a completely separate account? Like what's that approach like?

- So for our we'll call them enterprise plus, mid-market plus in most companies. For those larger organizations, our BDRs would work in conjunction with an account executive, build a strategy around that account. That strategy should include lines of business and hypothesis statements about each of them. And then the personas and persona stories that coincide,

- Rishi. I'm gonna ask you a hard hitting question, Rishi.

- Okay go for it.

- You ready for this.

- [Rishi] No but let's do it.

- All right. If you had a big lead surge, come in Rishi.

- Yeah. And you had an existing account, how would you approach it, Rishi? And I'm asking this cause I wanna link this to sales enablement for a second. That's where we're going with this in a second. But how would you break into an account? Let's pretend we had a big customer and you wanted to expand it Rishi. I wanna know what you would say in a cold email or cold call when they're already a customer.

- When they're already a customer?

- [Ryan] Yeah, what would you do?

- Hey, what's up bro? Wanna I expand.

- Oh my God. So let's talk about sales enablement for a second. You obviously have to make playbooks that tell people like this is a guide and how you do this and how you approach it. Here's some customer stories and stuff. Who does that? It's like. Is there like a sales enablement team or is that you?

- We have a sales enablement team. We have content team from marketing that works and use HighSpot to organize a lot of the content around different initiatives.

- Yeah.

- But I would say we also like, I'm a big fan of buy-in and including our team in building those. So one of our intern projects this year is building a matrix of use cases by value stories as a quick way to identify links that reference back to HighSpot. But our team builds a lot of that with cross functional partners.

- We have that trouble here. Like people that know ReadIQ or come to our stuffen their product, I don't know what you guys do completely. I think we actually are not very good about communicating all the success stories we have with customers. How do you find those stories and figure out like is it a culture thing where you're like, "Hey team, you hear any good stuff "write it down and let's figure out how to make it "into a story or what do you do?"

- So yes, those are the documented ones. Certainly in negotiation. One of the negotiation levers is often logo rights or stories or references, things of that nature. I'm sorry to do this again. I'll plug another tool, but we use Gong a lot.

- Yeah. People want the tools here.

- [Justin] Al right.

- People love tools. Don't worry.

- Within Gong we'll use Gong to tag stories and then we will let in some of our enablement sessions, I think it's monthly at this point. Once a month, we do use case and storytelling across the team. We'll have them listen to some stories, listen to some Gong snippets, and then come and bring their own. And that's one way we drive tribal knowledge of stories across the team.

- Hey, Justin a quick question. So what is the best performing content you guys do for Slack? So what types of collaterals drive the highest conversion for you? And then how do you measure that?

- You're gonna hate this answer. Hyper personalized emails.

- Yeah we love the answer. Are you kidding me? That's like everything we're about.

- So hyper personalized emails on the outbound end is the biggest way to drive or hyper person--

- On the outbound end I would say personalization at scale on the inbound end but yeah, hyper personalization is our highest converting. And then Rishi, I think the way we lead up to that is through the stories and used cases we share. So it's about creating, I mean, you brought up challenger sale. I think challenger sales says teach tailor take control. I don't necessarily use that in our talk track. But in email content you can teach through creating awareness, use cases, persona based content, tailored to the individual their role, where they are in the company, and then ask for time with a personalized outreach. So wait, you said you guys personalize a scale. So how does your team manage to personalize a scale? And then what technologies help you scale that? Okay, so we use SalesLoft another tool. And in terms of SalesLoft, we have certain steps within the cadence, where we have, I think the team calls it programmatic personalization or something to that extent, but it's research that we can do at scale and that we can insert with ease. And so that's more on the inbound volume approach. We also play around with where we put that step in a cadence and try to dig into the data around that.

- What are you using for research when you are doing your personalization? Is it LinkedIn? Is it Sales Nav? Is it some other data hopefully? It's, I'm sure there's probably a competitor use of ours too. But like what are you doing?

- Certainly LinkedIn, Sales Nav. I think some of the team use, what's it called? Alor and Crystal Knows and some of those tools. And then because we do sell the large enterprise companies we look at public filings and 10Ks.

- Oh, that's smart. How do you go through publicly traded information? Is there a provider you use the aggregate summaries of those things or do you guys literally download a PDF and read the whole transcript? Like what's that like

- Learn control F in your buzzwords.

- We're having problems with, you know , you just like command F communication. Command F collaboration. Command F siloded. Like--

- You look at things like that, you can look at digital transformation initiatives, you can look at what types of roles they're hiring for so you can scan on LinkedIn to see, if they're hiring Slack admins. That's usually a good indicator.

- Anything with synergy in it?

- [Justin] No synergy.

- It's technically synergy.

- With that's one of those buzzwords we're not allowed to use, right?

- Good, good. Alright. You gotta be careful with Rishi, he loves buzzword. Look at him.

- I love them.

- There's actually there's a question from Colleen. Real quick. What leads scoring tool do you use?

- Sorry. What's that?

- What lead scoring tool do you guys use? We for better, for worse have built a proprietary one right now?

- I feel like, can we ask a couple of questions or is it too much. Will be too much to tell.

- No, that is not like for market. It's just for our internal use.

- Yeah, yeah I know. I mean, can we ask about like what inputs you're looking at?

- [Justin] Sure.

- Yeah. So what inputs do you look at for it? So if someone's using a lead scoring tool and not building something on their own, they probably could replicate a lot of this stuff with a lead scoring tool.

- [Justin] Yeah.

- There's kinda two things that usually you see companies look at. Things that are tied to activity and things that are static tied to traits and characteristics.

- [Justin] Yeah. Is it both those things? Are there other secret sauce things that you are including?

- Yeah. So I look at it as a quadrant and we, I think one of the buzz words for Rishi, we use a fit and engagement. There you go. So fit would be the static ones engagement, like you said Ryan.

- [Ryan] Yeah.

- And fit and engagement create then a quadrant, right? And so you have your fit score on one axis, your engagement score on another. And obviously where you have both aligned, that's hyper focused point your inbound team must fill up point your resources at. Then you have maybe high fit below engagement. This is a great hunting ground for a BDR or AE team. And then you think about things below the line where maybe there's a good fit from an industry perspective but no engagement, no title, no good persona. That's great nurture field for marketing to do either account-based outreach or otherwise.

- I just got cold called her in the middle of the show. I know, cause this person's been leaving me voicemails and I haven't got back to him yet. You guys do cold calling.

- Oh yeah.

- What it more call, email? I know you're using sales off, but are you--

- [Justin] We're emailed.

- Like what's the activity?

- Yeah.

- I think more shifts to that in current state simply because less people. Not everyone's forwarded their office phone to their home.

- [Ryan] Yeah. Yeah.

- But when we do get somebody on the phone we've got a lot of training in place to make sure we maximize those conversations.

- Do you guys do your research for a personalization before the cold call a lot of the time too or is it kind of more like on phone? It's more just about getting the connected and having the reps prepared with a talk track?

- No, they certainly should know their hook statement and the hook statement should be personalized on the phone call.

- So the research and the things you look at one of the things that we've noticed with some of our customers is as companies have grown there seems to be a tendency where you, your personalization lines up to the person as opposed to the account. Like that's something we're seeing. Is that kind of true for you guys too?

- No, I would say our personalization is two fold. So I think some people, I forget, some people call it a three by three, but it's like industry persona company, and impersonalization. You can either put all three of those together or some sort of combination there in. And so I don't think, it's not consistent for every account. It's more based on what we find in the research.

- Yeah. And the personas that you line up in the value propositions, I'm assuming those are coming from the customer stories your team's collecting, right?

- Correct.

- So there's a question from Lindsey. You mentioned not using this challenger for talk tracks what sales methodologies do you recommend? Or do you use?

- I wanna make sure, I'm a big fan of challenger, I just think in my part of the sales motion currently at Slack, it's not as applicable as it would be, maybe in our SMB segment. So big fan of challenger. Right now, I probably train mostly winning by design, coupled with some Sandler and certainly wouldn't be wholistic if he didn't have John Barrows and Morgan involved there too. But I think our system is really closely aligned to winning by design. [Rishi] Nice.

- So one of the things I think we wanted to talk about a little bit too today, is what do you do, you measure reps activities everyday? Like, do you have an activity goal? And what are you measuring for your reps?

- I'm not much of an activity based leader. I always tell my teams like, we'll look at activities, but activities are something we should look at as a function of results and outcomes. And so yeah, we have rough activity metrics. Certainly it's something that we'll look at, but I always tell my team, I've never looked at a number of native challenge. Ever.

- Yeah. So you care more about the output. You're basically saying like the outputs--

- I care more about the coaching and trainings. So focused on their execution, how they do it, how we're improving that. And then we'll look at the numbers afterwards as a way to pivot our coaching and training.

- So question here from the audiences. What's the best approach to target audience top down or top up? I mean, user influencer decision maker or vice versa.

- Can we just, let's put them into two different questions. Where she start with the first half and then let's do the bottom up. Is that cool?

- [Rishi] Yeah.

- I wanna hear about the answers actually for us. We're dealing with this too. Great question by the way. So can you do the first half, what's your approach top down? And then we'll do bottom up after if that's okay, Justin.

- So essentially how do we navigate the power line from C level down?

- Yeah, let's start with that. And then we'll flip it afterwards. Yeah.

- Yup. So I would say when we often, we will start with C level in some scenarios. Where we have account-based intel, where we already have some sort of knowledge, where there's some sort of media or some other research that's indicated that is meaningful. In a lot of cases though we're gonna start gathering our context at the user level, understanding what they do today, what they wish they could do, what they enjoy about Slack. If it's a competitive situation, you know, why they prefer one or the other, we try to get our ducks in a row. And then when we talk to the C level, it's from a perspective of information, rather than simply asking for a meeting. And that's more of our approach in most.

- Will you never reach at the C-Suite if like you don't have users coming in from their account, signing up for Slack. Like, is the playbook basically we don't touch C-Suite unless we have someone coming in with proof.

- No, we would reach out to C-Suite as well. Then we wanna make sure we align it to what are their corporate initiatives and enterprise space or large enterprise based on their 10Ks and research we've done.

- All right. So let's talk bottom up. I think this is actually something that a lot of companies that are similar to you guys including us that have self sign up and have people sign up. You have a user come in, what happens next? What's the play?

- So there's different user levels, right? But the play would be, if it's in one of our target accounts, we would get that signal so to speak. And again, our emotion starts with empathy. So if somebody just signed up with our product, probably should make sure they're getting value out of it. And understand why they signed up for it and what they were hoping to get through the course of that conversation, understanding maybe areas of the opportunity they didn't know about. And then trying to leverage that for the next conversation. In other cases, users give us great information including the stakeholder landscape. And so the stakeholder landscape then tells us okay, what are their drivers? What's your relationship with them? What were they looking for with Slack? And really being able to understand our stakeholders and what makes them tick and what motivates them. So that when we do reach out to them, we're more likely to make it meaningful and less likely for it to feel like a cold call.

- Can we, can I ask you a specific question? If you can't give this it's totally cool. I understand it's proprietary. What's the quota for an outbound rep. Like what, how many ops they have to get them up?

- It's an average. So I'd say an average of five.

- Okay. So it's super, super heavy on like targeted accounts. Like these are bigger accounts that they're breaking into and stuff.

- Yeah. So within the, I mean, I think in some cases we have reps hitting quota. There's five opportunities but 20 meetings that were held to set those opportunities.

- Oh! I get it. So your qualification process actually probably has a way more stakeholders and departments than a normal company. Like it's probably like that into it, right?

- Yeah. Exactly. So like, for example, for people listening and you're trying to take an action item away from this, what you could potentially do, is you could actually take and target account that you're going after and make an account plan. Where you're trying to break into these different departments and fill that void with contacts. You might be prospecting. We'll you Justin, if you guys let's say you get an accountant and you have one department. Do you straight up outbound the other a department, if you're trying to expand and get that other stakeholder involved or do you bring up the experience and history with the other department first? Like, is it cold or is it bringing up the context?

- We would do both. Meaning in some organizations we work with where it's tens of thousands of employees. There's a good chance that the departments aren't connected even though they're adjacent. And so in a lot of times, it's more about, do we have a happy customer? What's their story? How do we leverage that to grow for a conversation with the other department? But we know that their use cases are gonna be unique and it's more important to speak to that. Than, you know, if we're talking to sales and you talk about IT Integrations with JIRA, their eyes roll in the back of their head, you better get to Salesforce or some Gong pretty good. Rishi's eyes are always rolled in the back of the head when I talk.

- Always it's ugh. Anyway so, one question I have is how are the managers measuring rep activities? And then how are they leveraging this to their coaches and stuff?

- Okay. So certainly we use Salesforce, SalesLoft in Gong, to measure activities. We also have all of our collaboration between reps and their counterparts in Sales and Slack channel. And so what we're able to look at is hard numbers, coupled with collaboration and strategy. And then in our management meetings we can say; these are the accounts you worked, this is the activities you did. Here's the strategy. As you outlined it with your account executives, let's talk about the execution. Or let's talk about where our conversion dropped. And again, it's either, as I said, we borrow from winning by design, they have a framework results, effort, knowledge, skills, Rex for coaching. And I think our team uses that linearly in their one-on-ones.

- Great question, Rishi. Did you come up with that on your own?

- It's all me right up here.

- All grown up dude. Look at you. The mama bird. I'm the mama bird and I'm letting you leave the nest. It's really exciting.

- You won't let me leave the nest.

- Justin, couple of things let's talk about where you think the future of sales is heading a little bit. Let's get into the nitty gritty of this a little bit. Companies are playing catch up. We basically squeeze something that was gonna take four or five years of everyone going to remote and being accountable on their own and more independent. I think one thing we're seeing culturally is a shift of your personal and professional life are kinda meshing together because of COVID and stuff. What do you think is the future of selling? Like what's going on in the future that you're thinking about for 2021 for Slack? Post all this stuff happening this year. Heavy questioned by the way? It's okay, if you don't have an answer.

- No, I think it's certainly top of mind and something my managers and I talk about regularly. You know, it's funny. I realized that there was a lot of things that we benefited from organically. In the office culture that sort of look over your shoulder, "Hey, I'm stuck here. "How do I do it?" Or that get off the phone and you're like, "Oh my God, that guy was such an asshole." And the person is like, "Let's go grab a coffee before we make the next call." You don't get that time. And so how do we and because that was organic with so much part of our culture, now we almost have to reinvent then culture. So how do we create spaces for reps to do that? How do we create onboarding in a remote environment? At this point I think a third of my team is onboarded in a remote world. So those over the shoulder moments that I relied on for buddy systems and peer to peer coaching don't exist. And so it's being with my leaders, maniacally focused on how do we create those? Fortunately, we're able to leverage Slack and it's not a plug for the tool. It's just what Slack allows us to do. And so it's about creating those moments. And it's also about really being structured in our meetings and times by night. How do we take ownership of it?

- There's a question from the audience. What is top three goals for Slack marketing or sales currently?

- More, more and more.

- Top three goals for Slack. I would say espoused channel based messaging make sure that people understand the benefit of channel based messaging. Part of that is leveraging Slack Connect and our ability for external messaging to be leveraged companies like Snowflake and others that you all know are proving that in their sales motion today. And when it comes to marketing Slack grew organically through individuals adopting. Now as marketing it's how do we take what people saw on their own, the value they learned on their own and communicate that to people that weren't looking and don't necessarily know what they're missing.

- Sorry my projector died behind me. It makes it look like my life is empty. Justin are you guys, you're probably gonna get hit up by a bunch of reps for this, but like, are you guys looking to add stuff to your tech stack this year? That's... Like what are some B2B tech companies that you're keeping an eye on, for things Gong you've mentioned a couple of times, what are, like great that using Gong. By the way, like, I think a lot of companies should they're kinda throwing darts in the dark, if you're not using something like that now. We've been doing a lot of listening with our calls and stuff too, for helping with positioning for 2021. What are you looking for? Like, what's the future like? What are some companies you're looking and saying, "These guys know what they're doing. "They're doing some crazy innovative stuff."

- What I've realized for us is that companies that integrate with our solution make our team work faster. So like Drift. Getting off of the Drift platform and feeding those plugs into Slack made us faster. Gong feeding it into Slack made us leverage that Intel faster. SalesLoft faster. And so what I'm looking at for our tech stack, both existing in net new is what's gonna continue that model where Slack is this thin layer between your entire tech stack that we use it all together.

- That makes me really happy. You say that cause we've built something. For people that don't know that are customers, we actually recently built something where you can link up the Slack, it's in Beta. So you have to ask your reps about this. But we'll notify you if one of your prospects you're working changes jobs over Slack. And I can't think of a better trigger to actually reach out to someone then when they're at a new job. Right?

- Absolutely. Yeah.

- So I do wanna know we are getting close to time here. People wanna ask some questions it's kind of a last call for Justin. We don't wanna keep him too long. Cause he's super busy. What are you working on now? Like what's-- So someone asks about priorities and stuff but like what are you specifically working on for projects?

- I'm reinvisioning when we build a remote Salesforce like this in the future? How do we take the human lift off of onboarding? How do we create career paths that in the past would've happened also through that interpersonal relationship. And because of some of the groups I manage are looking to build a career of the company, it's important that we figure out how do we grow up with those relationships in a remote world? And I think a lot of the things I took for granted that happened in an office have to be more intentional. And so it's about building that for remote longterm environment.

- Hopefully you don't think that I'm ignorant of this. Is Slack gonna stay remote after. Like if you guys announced something like that. Or is that something that's been talked about yet.

- Means that the majority of Slack is remote.

- [Ryan] Yeah. For the undefined future.

- Yeah. We've actually done the same shift too. What we've done is we're gonna make a couple hub offices that like you could come to, if you need to just collaborate with people or something. But we're basically hiring in like 12 or 15 different cities and doing the remote thing as well. And I definitely think that it becomes harder and harder for the human side cause let's not forget this, reps are actually dealing with no, a lot. Rejection. And you wanna be able to vent and talk with people. Do you guys do like social meetings?

- Oh yeah. Lots of social meetings. I've brought in magicians to my leadership meeting and singing and anything to break it up. We talk about this concept of asynchronous work. And in the past we'd be able to go grab beer or a coffee or a burger or whatever during work, after work, and so now it's trying to create those. I tell my team is it's not as organic but we're gonna call it forced structured fun. And I think it's critical.

- Forced structured fun. I like it. By the way, you don't know this but me and Ryan, huge magic heads.

- Oh we literally, I have each other on Slack all the time. By the way, DM, IM, what's the right nomenclature in Slack.

- I think, you know, pick your verb. DM, Ting.

- ICIM. It literally everyone thinks that I'm talking about like AOL it's the messenger or something.

- Yeah

- Yeah. Yeah. It's usable, it's allowed, but like, yeah. We're we love magic. Oh my God. We're really lame. If anyone wants to do anything to impress me do a magic trick over video and I'll probably take a meeting with you

- Probably, you definitely will.

- It's done. Yeah, that's the way to prospect me. Justin, what else do you wanna say? We're kinda near at the end here. Like other things that you wanted to get off your chest with reps? Or are there things that you don't like about sales? You think that could change? Like what about those things? What are some things you think could change in sales for other companies? You luckily have the leadership and experience and a great culture that you've developed at Slack and Intuit and Conga, you get prospecting all the time. I'm sure by people, what grinds your gears?

- You know, I think like, the human elements become more and more important. And I mean, if I looked at my LinkedIn or showed you my LinkedIn or my email it's whittled down to noise. And so how do you break through that noise? Meet me like a human. At the end of the day, I'm stuck in my house and wearing elastic waistbands just like the rest of you probably. And so I like it when people have shown they've done the research, I like it when I speak to somebody and they can say that. I had somebody from a from a sales organization reach out to me the other day, and he was able to talk to me about Slack and how he'd used it personally in the past. And it was just obvious that he did something extra. And right now in the world of noise, do something extra. That's what I would say. Otherwise, you're gonna keep pushing me to my Slack channels and avoiding my emails. Because I know there's nothing unique there.

- Your home there's things you can do at home to stand out a little bit more. And I think another thing that I like is personalization isn't just something about the person. It can also be something that relates to you as well.

- [Justin] Yeah.

- Thank you very much, Justin, for coming on. We really appreciate it. Where do you wanna send people? Do you want them to go to Slack or do you want them to go to your LinkedIn? What do you want us to do?

- I would say if you enjoyed your time, feel free to come in to LinkedIn. And write me a DM or IM or Ting whatever you wanna call it. If you didn't enjoy your time, feel free to DM or IM, Ryan O'Hara at LinkedIn. And then I'd say for folks that are interested in learning more, we just had our frontiers event. You can still register for that event and access all the content. There's great speeches from zoom and other tech leaders there to check out. And if you're interested in Slack and wanna reach out to me directly, always here.

- Sweet. By the way, I'm a huge slacker. And so I always tell people I slacked. That should be the new thing.

- Slack in something, yeah. And Rishi and Ryan, I think we should set up a connect channel after this, so that I can learn more about ReadIQ in Slack.

- Oh, interesting. Hey, I got a question for you on this end. Do you guys add people to a Slack, when you're de working deals ever? I always thought that'd be a cool idea but I've been afraid to do it. Like make them guest.

- You can do it and look at our Snowflake use case. So every sales we try to spin up or connect channel with them, bringing in new stakeholders as we meet them, collaborate there, bringing our SES for demos, pin documents, et cetera.

- Well, Thank you very much for coming on Justin. On our end, couple of things coming up for the people. We're going to be actually making a to eBooks that are coming out. One is going to be working on sales optimization and some different ways you can work on optimizing your sales process. Look for that. You'll probably be in your inbox in a little while. Look at this projector just dying on me. This is what you use for... I'm using a projector. It was made for like windows 95. Second thing I want to tell you guys about is we're gonna be making a wrap up of our other B2B Tonight episodes from the whole year. If you wanna access this or check it out. You go Outbound TV, hit the B2B Tonight logo and you can watch our other episodes that we've done before. Not that Justin wasn't a good guest or unplugging other people, but that's the deal. Rishi, what do you want to tell the people? Do you just wanna say goodbye and get out of here? Or what do you want to do?

- I should do. I wanna say Thank you so much Justin for coming on and take care.

- Yeah, Justin, you're a great person. Thank you for doing this. We really appreciate it. Thank you everyone.

- Take care.