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Episode 2: Daniel Disney

B2B Tonight Transcript

Ryan O'Hara:

Wow. I see people have come back.

Rishi Mathur:

They love us. What can I say?

Ryan O'Hara:

Good. But that's good, dude. The second episode we do, it's not at zero. That means people enjoyed it the first time.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah. Or this is a whole batch of new people who have no idea what's happening.

Ryan O'Hara:

They're probably just sitting there and they're like, "Why did I do this? What's going on again? Who's Rishi?"

Rishi Mathur:

No, they're going to be like, this is going to be the best time of their lives. I made sure they know that.

Ryan O'Hara:

I think we should actually get a camera and do yearbook photos for everyone that attended this thing.

Rishi Mathur:

Oh, that's so true.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. So, as people pile in, we want to thank everyone for coming on today and doing this for B2B Tonight. This is our second episode. So, we've got some cobwebs that we've ironed out. Some little things. We're only going to get better at this as we keep going. Rishi's hair is only going to get longer-

Rishi Mathur:

Oh wait, Ryan, is my hair okay?

Ryan O'Hara:

Dude. I was thinking the same thing. No, it's not okay.

Rishi Mathur:

It's the best I could do. I don't understand. Why won't it stick down?

Ryan O'Hara:

You got to put some gel. You got to use a hairdryer. Maybe you have someone blow in your face while you're doing it.

Rishi Mathur:

What if I just did this for the whole time.

Ryan O'Hara:

I think it's going to not look... It's going to get worse. It's not good. The thing that will be interesting for me is if my hair just grows longer and gets worse as I do these things.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah, but you'll look like a Hansen.

Ryan O'Hara:

We'll see what happens. Actually, I had someone message me last night and said that their daughter saw... the mom was watching our first episode and they thought that she was watching a Zoom with Zac Efron on it. And I'm like, "No, I'm way more overweight than Zac Efron."

Rishi Mathur:

You are, but I can see it.

Ryan O'Hara:

Someone on LinkedIn once called me an overweight Tom Cruise. So, I won't forget that. Oh, someone's on here as Ryan's mom.

Rishi Mathur:

Ryan's mom. Aw, Ryan's mom is so true though.

Ryan O'Hara:

I think we're good to get rolling, I guess. We could start it and we'll go from there. Does that sound good?

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah. Actually, before we start, we should share some troubling news though. Shouldn't we?

Ryan O'Hara:

I suppose so. So, some sad things have happened over the past week that people might not be aware about. LeadIQ is obviously helping us put the show on and we've been promoting the hell out of it. We're telling people we had Daniel Disney as our guests this week, and something really surprising happened.

Ryan O'Hara:

I got an email on Monday from someone from Disney, and a lawyer from Disney, basically, shot me an email saying, "You can't use the Disney name when you're promoting B2B Tonight," and they had a huge problem with it. We had it all of our market materials, like social media, email. We'd shot it out on videos. We tagged Daniel Disney and they had a huge problem with it.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah. It was really terrible because we really blast this out, and then I don't know if you know this, Ryan, but I got an email... I think we both got an email, where the lawyer of Disney demands to speak with us. Like, right now.

Ryan O'Hara:

Like, during our show?

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

Are they trying to sabotage us or something?

Rishi Mathur:

I don't know, but he said, "You cannot do anything until I speak with you guys, 2:00PM Thursday, Eastern Standard Time." I said, "We have a webinar." He goes, "I don't care." So, I don't know what to do. I guess we have to bring them on.

Ryan O'Hara:

Are our attendees cool with that? Would everyone mind if we talked with the Disney lawyer for a couple minutes, for a second, and see what they think?

Rishi Mathur:

I mean, do we have a choice?

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, there he is right now.

Rishi Mathur:

And he just bombards in. Hello, sir.

Mel Garwood:

The name's Mel Garwood. All right? Mel Garwood here, and quite frankly, I am displeased and disgusted with your infringement and disrespect of my client's intellectual property in the Disney name.

Ryan O'Hara:

You realize, though, that our guest tonight, he was born with the name Daniel Disney. It's his last name. We're not infringing.

Mel Garwood:

That doesn't matter. Every time you use the word Disney on any marketing materials, emails, social media, and promos, it adds another zero to the lawsuit.

Rishi Mathur:

But it doesn't make any sense. What are we infringing on? His last name is literally Disney. You don't know.

Mel Garwood:

Yeah, and Ronald's last name is really McDonald, and he had a farm. E-I-E-I-O. You know what I'm saying? When you use the name Disney, you're crushed the dreams of tens of children everywhere, and for what? The sake of some silly talk show and some marketing materials. I mean, we built a media empire on beloved intellectual property. You know what, I'm going to show you some of it right here.

Rishi Mathur:

Did you see tens of kids?

Mel Garwood:

Tens, everywhere.

Ryan O'Hara:

This is... So...

Mel Garwood:

You know what? Kids everywhere love Mickey Rat. Here he is, born in 1929 in a little steam boat for children everywhere. Infecting the hearts of all these beloved children. Of course, you can't forget about his best friend in the whole entire world...

Rishi Mathur:

I thought it was Mickey Mouse.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. It's so weird.

Mel Garwood:

Yeah, Mickey Rat, his best friend, Donald Goose here. Look at how beautiful this goose is. He's another beloved character of my good friend and partner, Walter Disney. He hand drew this himself. You can never forget about the great Doofy as well. He's beautiful. Look at him. He's so handsome and hilarious, and of course, everybody's favorites, pet, Pluto. I mean, we can't forget about these characters and all that, and how beloved all these children everywhere.

Rishi Mathur:

That was a planet.

Ryan O'Hara:

You didn't even... literally... hold on a second. It says Walter Disney at the bottom of those slides. You didn't even rip off the dog. You just put a planet there.

Mel Garwood:

You know what? Whatever. You'll be hearing from my lawyers and I'll see you in court, turkeys.

Rishi Mathur:

What just happened?

Ryan O'Hara:

Rishi? I don't know what to do. I think we're in the clear, because I think I saw some infringement there that had nothing to do with us. Why don't we get to our guests today? Let's get into it. So, I'm a little shocked. We were trying...

Rishi Mathur:

By the way, I should apologize to the audience for us going through that. I'm sorry about that, guys.

Ryan O'Hara:

We thought it was going to be serious business. We did not realize that was going to happen. Apologies.

Rishi Mathur:

Also, I do not look like Quasimodo. Someone said that.

Ryan O'Hara:

Someone said that? Someone said you looked like Quasimodo?

Rishi Mathur:

Speaking of Disney, he looks like Quasimodo in a suit.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. They're not wrong. All right. So, let's jump into it a little bit. We've got some great people here. I want to say hi to the people that are attending, by the way. Let's introduce our next guest. Our only guest, I guess, that was planned. Let's introduce Daniel Disney. For some people that don't know about Daniel Disney, he is out of the UK. He's written a great book on social selling, that is one of the top sales books that people buy. He has great posts online. He's a trader. Everyone knows him. Everyone say hi. Daniel Disney, what's up?

Daniel Disney:

Hey guys, I am pumped to be here. And that was one of the funniest things I think I've seen. I'm shocked that the lawyers were trying to pounce on you guys.

Ryan O'Hara:

Well, you've got to be careful.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah, and that's also not funny because it scared us. We were terrified. For the entire week, we've been terrified.

Ryan O'Hara:

I feel so relieved now that we know what really happened, and we cleared that up. Well, so what's up with you? How are you dealing with the pandemic and stuff? You've been okay, Daniel?

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. No doing okay. Obviously trying to keep safe, and make sure friends and family are okay. Trying to adapt, as we all are. It's a crazy time and sympathies go out to everyone who's been negatively impacted by it, but it's interesting seeing everyone go digital. Everyone's now working from home. They're having to Zoom call and there's certainly a lot more presence on social. So, it's been quite fascinating seeing how everything's adapting and changing.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, we were actually thinking through the schedule of what we wanted to do for content, and my whole content calendar has basically been shaken up because a lot of people work at companies that sell into spaces you can't prospect into right now. So, if you're not going to spend your time prospecting and you're still at that company, it's a great time to actually do brand building with social. And I thought it'd be cool to talk about a couple of things today.

Ryan O'Hara:

We're going to dive into some tactical stuff with social. We're going to talk about, as an individual and as a manager, how you can enable your team to live off LinkedIn when you're prospecting. And lastly, we'll probably do some cool stuff with how to do InMail and send messages, and comment if you see something. So, we'll tackle some of those things, but mostly, we can answer questions for you. So, there's a little Q&A down at the bottom of the Zoom.

Ryan O'Hara:

You can submit questions or you can ask in chat. Rishi and I are going to manage and eyeball once in a while. Daniel's here. He's game to take on questions. You can ask a silly question, serious question, whatever you want to do. Don't be shy. If you want us to not say your name, just tell us or ask anonymously. Let's jump in with a quick question. Daniel, let's start with, as a sales rep or someone that's working, selling, how do you set up a good LinkedIn profile for yourself? What should you put in it? Like, what's the frame of mind that you should be doing?

Daniel Disney:

Sure. There's three things that I recommend to sales reps. Simple things. Number one is get a good photo. Obviously, at the moment, you can't go and get a professional photographer to do one. You can't hire one in, but try and find a plain wall and get someone, or put your phone up on a timer and just a nice plain background, shoulders and above, looking at the camera. Just get a nice, simple, professional photo.

Daniel Disney:

Number two is your background. So, we all have this little background space behind our photo. Create something that's like a mini billboard. I use something called Canva.com. It's free to use. It's got all the templates. You just drag and drop, and add a few words, but it just starts to bring the profile to life. Then the third thing that's really important is your summary. I think a lot of sales reps will just have a single paragraph, like the about me section of your CV, and you've got a ton of space there.

Daniel Disney:

Just write about how you help people. Focus it on the customer, not on you. It's not about how great you are at selling. It's about how you help people, what you helped them achieve, how you've helped people already, and how they can get in touch with you. Focus it on them. Those three things instantly transform your sales reps profiles and, and bring them to life, and a lot more customer focused.

Rishi Mathur:

So, what's an example of a good summary they you've seen, personally?

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. I mean, obviously check out my profile for the general structure, but it's just going to start off, "This is what we do. This is what we offer. This is who we help." So, they'll start to describe the type of people they work with. So, "Maybe we help VPs of marketing, marketing directors, marketing managers. We help them achieve X, Y and Z. We do this with our product or service, which is this.

Daniel Disney:

Here are some similar companies that we've worked with," maybe a couple of bullet points. "Here's a few examples of ROI's that we've achieved," and then at the end, "If you want to see if we might get to help you achieve something similar, please get in touch, and here's several contact methods, whether it's LinkedIn message, email, phone number, et cetera.

Daniel Disney:

Here's a link to our website," and so on. Suddenly you've got a nice, expensive summary that explains, and it's almost like a qualifying process. People are reading it through and ticking themselves in or out, which is what you want. Hopefully by the end of it, the people that are more likely to be your customers are the ones that are going to get in touch.

Rishi Mathur:

And Jenny asked, what was the background you used?

Daniel Disney:

The background for my... the background image? So, I created one on Canva for years, which just had use some key words, something like helping salespeople sell more with social. For me, obviously I was the product. So, I had another picture of me, but if you're ...

Ryan O'Hara:

I'll show a screenshot for you guys, too, so people can see. So this is how Daniel sets up his profile up here. He's got...

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. So this is a new one. I've actually had this. I paid for this to be done. This is the first time I paid for it. There's a few companies now that are outsourcing it, where they'll create a professional banner for you. So, this then just takes it a step further, a lot more digital, and a lot more creative, but it's the same principle, picture of me and highlights what I do. Short and simple, nothing complicated. You just want that first impression of good picture, background. Okay. I know what that person does. I'm going to read on.

Rishi Mathur:

And then your personality, obviously.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, I'll connect this a little bit to prospecting, too, on my end. That's what the filter... I'm going to look at this for. If you're an SDR, EE, or you're a manager trying to get your reps to use LinkedIn more, I think it's a good idea not to use canned LinkedIn about me sections. The thing that makes reps really unique, you're reaching out to extraordinary people. That means that you need to seem extraordinary.

Ryan O'Hara:

If I go out, let's say I was writing a cold email to Mark Zuckerberg, for example. If I just have a boiler plate LinkedIn copying piece thing about the company I work at or something, and for some reason, he looked at our LinkedIn, he probably wouldn't... because I think he looks at LinkedIn as a competitor, but he's going to look at my profile. I don't want it to look boring and different. You want to be unique and crank it up a little bit. Figure out a way, almost, have it be like your own brand on stuff.

Ryan O'Hara:

You can talk about your company and how you help people, but it doesn't have to... Remember, you're not your company and the person you're prospecting, they're not their company, either. We're individuals. Especially, and I'm sure people have heard this so many times, we've seen data that shows that the average person is changing jobs once every 18 months. So, think of that, the loyalty of companies has gone.

Rishi Mathur:

By the way, Ryan, your mom asked, "How do I know when it's too many messages to send a prospect on LinkedIn, and what is a spam limit/over-under?

Ryan O'Hara:

Do you want to tackle that on Daniel?

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. No. For Ryan's mom, happy to answer that one.

Ryan O'Hara:

Thank you for being polite to her, by the way.

Daniel Disney:

That's okay, Mrs. O'Hara, nice to see you. There's no number to put by. I mean, we all know the spam limits. I think if you're messaging more than three or four times, without a reply, you need to start looking at other modes, whether it's a phone call, voicemail, email. Maybe try a video message or an audio message, but when you're starting to not get a reply and you're just sending similar style messages, you're starting to hit the limit.

Daniel Disney:

Going back to Ryan, your point about those template summaries that some companies send out, where they'll send out an email to everyone and say, right, here is exactly what you need to put in all the sections. You're right. There's no originality into it. People buy from people. So, let your sales people become human beings, become themselves and express themselves uniquely, but provide guidelines. Guidelines are good.

Rishi Mathur:

Can I ask you guys both a question? How do you guys figure out what your personality is and your voice online? Because that's a very tough thing to do, because how do you know what it is? How do you know what you want to sound like?

Ryan O'Hara:

You want to go first?

Daniel Disney:

Well, there's two things. Yeah. I'll chuck in two things quickly. I'd be interested to hear your views as well, Ryan, but the things I tend to advise, A, you'll find your voice the more you're active on social. So, when I first started using social, I didn't have a voice. I didn't know what my voice was. I found it over the following weeks and months of using it.

Daniel Disney:

You find it by sharing content, engaging content. So, part of it is going to come through just using social more, but there are activities you can do to brainstorm it. Look at what you like, what the content that you consume is like, what your tone is like. Are you positive? Are you challenging? You humorous. You can brainstorm a lot of that information and then just start to feed off of that.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, I'm totally with you on that. The way I look at it, you want to be a peacock a little bit. You don't want to be arrogant, but you want to be a peacock where you stand out and make someone stop and say, "Whoa, what's going on there?" One thing that I see that works very well, and some of you might've heard me talk about this before, we actually do a thing at LeadIQ called brand archetyping.

Ryan O'Hara:

The idea is that there's 12 archetypes that you can pick, and it's how you want to build your brand up to be a certain way. For example, if I'm a hero brand, I'm going to frame myself to be the... I'm going to be the person that's up for a challenge. I'll talk about challenges that I've overcome. If I'm a rebel brand, I'm going to talk about how I'm trying to rewrite the rule book, throw things out and do it again.

Ryan O'Hara:

If I'm a gesture brand, I'm going to do a dumb B2B late night talk show with Rishi. That's actually literally what we're trying to do, is be a gesture brand and make you laugh, and have a good time, and entertain you while still giving you information and stuff. The biggest tip that I'd give for personality, don't do what everyone else is doing.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, if you go to your space and you see that... I'll give you an example. In my space, where we do a lot of stuff with helping people with prospecting, there's a ton of companies that are out there that are sage brands. They're the smartest person in the room. They share insight and data. We're going to share insight and data with you, but we're going to try and make you laugh while we give you that data.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, that's a perspective on how you could do it. The goal for someone that's building a brand online, you should pick one archetype and commit to it. My favorite example of this, if you haven't heard this talk before, is Taylor Swift. Taylor Swift is what I call a lover brand. As a 32 year old man, whose mom, apparently, attends his own talk show, I love Taylor Swift.

Ryan O'Hara:

One of the things that Taylor Swift does, that's so effective, and one of the reasons she's been on the change genres and have people to follow her, she's a lover brand. She's all about loving her fans, loving her listeners. She talks about love in her life. She talks about her love life. She talks about all those things. She's intimate. She tells you stuff, and I wish I had a second person who could just throw water in my face and splash me to get me to stop talking about Taylor Swift.

Daniel Disney:

I'm waiting for you to start to jump into a song there, Ryan.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah, I really thought you were going to break out singing and then you say something about Kim Kardashian. I don't know,

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, we don't talk... That's a sensitive issue and you know that, but my point is, people really like Taylor Swift, because she does this lover brand. For example, if you're a company that's a lover brand or a person, maybe you send Valentine's day cards to your prospects in the mail and say, "Hey, if you like this, snap a photo, put it online, and tag me." You can do something like that.

Ryan O'Hara:

If you're a lover brand and you love a customer, maybe you write a love letter to a customer and just post it online, and type that customer that you want. There's a lot of really cool things that you can do to show and establish that brand that you want to be. A company that does the lover brand really well, that I like bringing up, is SalesLoft. A lot of the stuff they do is about loving sales.

Ryan O'Hara:

They talk about loving their employees. I'll constantly see that... like, I saw a post once from Forester. The STR manager there posted a video of... or posted an image of the sales op team surprising them with gifts. Then they did sales training with them for 30 minutes over a lunch hour once.

Ryan O'Hara:

That's a really nice thing to do, and it's an easy little tactical thing you can do over LinkedIn, that makes you stand out a little bit more, as opposed to the stock, "Hello, blah, blah, blah. Let me talk about my service or whatever I'm trying to sell you." Daniel, do you find... Someone that's online, you'd probably see a lot of people that go on there and sell right away. Doesn't that drive you? What's the right approach to do that when you're on LinkedIn?

Daniel Disney:

I literally posted about it today. That , oh, I'm going to connect with someone, and then within five minutes, I'm going to spam them with a sales pitch message, and it happens to all of us. It happens to me. It happens to decision-makers that I speak to. It's crazy. I call it sales auto pilot. It's this bizarre place that salespeople often go to.

Daniel Disney:

You see it when you say, "Sell me this pen," and they'll just start vomiting out features and benefits of this imaginary pen. We know that's not the way to sell, but it's that autopilot ‘I need to sell something. This is what I think I need to do'. My message around my post today was really about playing it cool. Take a step back. Let's stop trying to throw as much stuff at the wall and see what sticks. Let's stop spraying and praying, and see what comes back.

Daniel Disney:

Let's start to be a lot more professional with our sales approach and make sure we're qualifying our prospects up front, make sure we're actually working on people we genuinely believe that we can help. Then let's just be smart in our usage of communication. So like I said, if you send a message or two messages, and you're not getting a reply, change tact. Don't keep banging that same drum over and over, because you're only going to push them further and further away.

Daniel Disney:

Pick up the phone and try and call them. Jump on a camera and record a quick 30 second video, and send a video to them. Try audio. People have different preferences. Some people will prefer it if you send them a video, and they're more likely to reply if you send them a video. So just, I think it's adapting that multi cadence approach instead of just trying to do the same thing over and over.

Rishi Mathur:

And my... oh, sorry. Daniel.

Ryan O'Hara:

I am... oh, no, I'm sorry.

Rishi Mathur:

The question is, how do you feel about cold InMails as prospecting tools?

Daniel Disney:

InMails have one of the lowest conversion rates, I think, from a prospecting method, maybe even lower than cold calls. They're not great. Obviously, there is a percentage that does convert, so you can't ignore them, but my recommendation to salespeople, where possible, is try and connect first. If you can, do a bit of engagement first, and then message directly. You'll get a far better response, but sometimes, that's physically not possible. So, attempting an InMail is certainly worth a shot, but conversions are pretty low.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, I'll tell you something that I think about with this. When we think about where everyone works and how everything is with prospecting and social selling, a lot of it's about getting familiar with your prospect and getting your prospect familiar with your name. If you do social selling and you put your name out there regularly, you're going to see a bump in response rates on your emails. You're going to see a bump in your call rates when you get responses back from people, when you leave voicemails. What I would recommend...

Daniel Disney:

I'll give you a quick example about this. This is what spurred on this social selling journey. I mean, this was six, seven years ago when I just started playing around with LinkedIn and I started to share content, and I saw this transition in first conversations with prospects, where normally I would spend the first five, 10, 15 minutes explaining who I was, what I did, where I worked, et cetera. And I started to find conversations, whether it was on the phone, or even face to face.

Daniel Disney:

The first thing they'd say to me is, "Dan, I loved that post you shared last week. We've been following your posts for the last few weeks." That is a huge step forward for a sales person to, A, be more at their level, so you're not looking up to them as the prospect you're trying to sell to. You're suddenly equals, but you're able to then jump into a more constructive, positive conversation, instead of spending X amount of time trying to convince them that they can trust you. That trust has already started to be earned. So yeah, you're right. A digital presence can have an impact on all areas of sales.

Ryan O'Hara:

Think of it from this perspective. If you're someone... I get prospected at time, cause I'm a VP of Marketing, and if I see someone message me and it's a name that I've seen over and over again on social, I'm way more likely to open the badge when it comes up on my phone. If it's an InMail on LinkedIn, I'm way more likely to actually look at the InMail, even if I'm not connected to them, if they've liked or commented, or engaged on posts that I've done before.

Ryan O'Hara:

There are people that I feel like I know, that I've never met before, who regularly talk and say nice things about the programs that we're doing or marketing, or movies or videos that we're putting on social, all that stuff. It increases familiarity, just doing likes and comments. In the words of Daniel Beach Hill, just sit back, hang out if they added you, start commenting and engaging on the posts that they have regularly.

Ryan O'Hara:

If you find... this is a cool transition, actually, for this. When someone is connected, I actually think it's a better idea to use... I like using LinkedIn as my second touch. So, I might add someone on LinkedIn, but do my first touch off of LinkedIn, with email or phone, and bring up something that I noticed that was on LinkedIn that was interesting about them. Why am I picking them? Why are they special to me? You can find a quick trigger really quick by looking at a profile. Daniel, do you ever look at that stuff? Like, when you're figuring out your message, you probably read someone's profile pretty well, right?

Daniel Disney:

You have to. It's just doing your homework. It's making an effort, which unfortunately, a chunk of salespeople don't do, and there's reasons for that bad management, et cetera, but it is a little effort that can have a huge impact. Spending 10 to 30 seconds quickly scrolling through someone's profile, scrolling through their activity feed, you can find gold nuggets of information that you can say, "Oh, Ryan! Loved that post you shared last week."

Daniel Disney:

Or, "loved that B2B Tonight's show that you guys did the other night. That was brilliant. Tuned in." Suddenly, you know I've made an effort. I'm complimenting you, flattery. You're going to feel good about it. There's all these positive feelings coming in, instead of a salesperson jumping in, where they know nothing about you. They've done no homework. It was a big difference, but it's...

Ryan O'Hara:

You're right. I do feel good about it. Thank you. Rishi's going to take... he's going to print a screenshot of this and then put it on his mom's fridge, next to his [crosstalk 00:23:57].

Daniel Disney:

You can go a step further, Ryan, and be like, "Ryan, you look like Zach Efron," and then suddenly that's it. You've got your foot in the door and away you go.

Rishi Mathur:

Why are all the comments going to this guy? I'm sitting right here. Would love some sent my way.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hey, if you guys want to compliment Rishi in chat, you can... they can say he's doing great. He tied his own tie. That's a big deal.

Rishi Mathur:

It's very tough. Having said that, an anonymous attendee asks, for InMails, is there any data around success of using messages to drive people back to your initial email?

Daniel Disney:

Sorry. InMail messages and email?

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

Like, you use your InMail, basically, to tell someone to go look at the email you sent them, or a phone that you sent... voicemail, whatever other tactic you did. Do you have any [crosstalk 00:24:37] data around that at all or anything?

Daniel Disney:

Got you. I haven't seen any data around it. I'll do some digging to see if I can find some, and if I can, I'll share it to the audience, but nothing that I've seen ... Again, InMails come through cold, and there's a psychological impact of seeing an InMail come in. You know when it's come in, someone's paid to send it to you. It's like seeing sponsored ad. When you see a post shared on social media, you know someone's paying to share it, which means they generally want something back.

Daniel Disney:

So there's a bit of a psychology behind initial reactions to that. Again, I would always recommend going down message. If you've connected with someone, you've tried to call them, sending a message where you're connected and just saying, "John, tried to call you today. I understand you're in a meeting." That tends to work quite well. And again, don't forget to explore. We've got three types of messages you can send, written, video and audio.

Ryan O'Hara:

The scary, the scary part, too, is if you send that... So, I have personal experience doing this, because I did this when I was prospecting at Dine. I did it when I first started prospecting at LeadIQ. I noticed that with InMail, it's almost like you're writing a cold email to someone and your subject says cold email. Well, that's, I think, what the comparison is, a little bit. What I would do instead, is try and send an InMail to someone. Don't send a calendar. Don't ask for a meeting with InMail. Ask them to go do something else.

Ryan O'Hara:

You can ask them to go look at the email. You could ask them to add. Like, "Hey, I'm going to send you a connection request. The reason I want to connect with you, I was poking around your profile. And I saw a lot of mutual people that..." Don't generic it. Actually be specific. That's another thing that a lot of people do on LinkedIn, right? And it drives me nuts. They do fake personalization, where they're like, "We have a lot of mutual connections." You know how badly I just want to write back and be like, "Oh, really? Who?"

Ryan O'Hara:

Or accept their LinkedIn connection request, find their number, call them and be like, "Hey, you said we had mutual connections. Who are you thinking of?" Instead, you'll get a way higher conversion rate, if you actually name drop a specific person. I'll give you a perfect example of this. One of the friends of LeadIQ, we've done a lot of stuff with them, Josh Braun, has a program that he does for prospecting training.

Ryan O'Hara:

Everyone should check it out. He's great, by the way. Josh literally will tell people to go add me, when he's doing his lessons on how to add someone on LinkedIn. He uses me as a dummy for it, but what I love is that, the messages that I get from all the people that are part of his program will say, "Josh told us to add you from the BTB Marketing Guide."

Ryan O'Hara:

Maybe it's okay to just spell out how you found that prospect on LinkedIn. That's not a bad first message. Like, "I found you in a search." Another one that comes up for me is, a lot of people say, "Hey, I saw your recommendation, because I'm connected with Dave Gearhart from..." Used to work at Drift, though he's at Privy. I see that, I'm like, oh, cool. I know they found me. They found me from that. If you're targeting marketers, they care where you're coming from on that end.

Ryan O'Hara:

If you're targeting IT or network engineers and stuff, some of the stuff you might mention, and be like, "Hey, I saw your work. You're building this." Talk about the thing they're building. They love that stuff. I remember I used to go after these network engineers and solution architects, and all these people building these crazy networks up and stuff. I used to just be like, "Holy crap. You've literally been working on something that gets millions of people using it every day. That must feel pretty cool," and it works. They'll talk about it and be really passionate about it. I think it's a really cool idea.

Daniel Disney:

It's such a little effort that has a huge impact. I think a lot of salespeople over-complicate it. Or they think, "Oh, I need to spend hours looking at someone's profile." You're literally talking about seconds to find and consume that information, and then just use it in a very clever way. It's a little effort that goes a long way.

Rishi Mathur:

By the way, very well put very eloquent, very articulate. You're very charming.

Ryan O'Hara:

Who? Daniel or me?

Rishi Mathur:

[crosstalk 00:28:22] Daniel over here, I want my compliment.

Ryan O'Hara:

Who? Me?

Daniel Disney:

Thank you, Rishi. Thank you.

Ryan O'Hara:

Dude, what an ego that I have. Daniel, what about... One thing I wanted to ask you is, do you feel like a lot of people on social are doing stuff that's maybe a little too selfish? Like, is that a good guideline? "Hey, be less selfish when you're doing stuff."

Daniel Disney:

Oh, 100%. I use the famous sales 80/20 split, but I use it in social to say 80% of what you do on social should be giving, then earning the opportunity for 20% to maybe ask for something back, but most salespeople in businesses are just as guilty about it. Ryan, I'm sure you see this marketing departments sometimes fall in this trap, certainly, in smaller businesses, where 80% of what they chuck out there is just advertisement stuff.

Daniel Disney:

It's very take stuff, not giving value, and it's the companies that then push out more value giving content that's entertaining, thought insights, et cetera, and knowledge based, that generate greater audiences, greater engagement rates. So, yeah, 100%, try and give more. Whether that's the content you share, whether it's what your messaging, everything you do on social, try and give value.

Daniel Disney:

A, it's a nice thing to do, but it's amazing how much more you generate from it. The challenge, I guess, that a lot of sales teams find it, and certainly a lot of sales leaders find, is giving isn't a metric. It's not the same as picking up the phone and making a hundred cold calls. It could take time, and that's where it gets a little bit complicated, but it works. It's just about building it into the strategy.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, a couple things. I just want to add a couple things really quick, Rishi, if that's okay.

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

Couple of things I want to add to that, too. Every person here, even if you're not a thought leader and you don't know a lot about your space, maybe you sell to a space and you can't even speak the language of the people you're selling to speak with tech or developers, or finance or something. Take customers stories, anonymize them and share them. That's a really easy thing to do.

Ryan O'Hara:

The best way to frame a story, set up a conflict, AKA a problem, present a solution, add a little fairy dust of like your cool personality stuff into it, and tell that story. You have people you're cold calling and talking to all the time that have cool experiences that you can bring up, right in a message or on a LinkedIn post. You don't have to necessarily be generic and just be like, "I don't have any insight. I'm just a rep that lives in my mom's basement. I'm writing 50 cold emails a day." You have some insight.

Ryan O'Hara:

Share stories when you eavesdrop on things from on the call, share experiences that you have. It's not your experience. You're just a connector to that world because you're talking with those thought leaders and other buyers, and decision makers that are similar in your space all the time. Make a little journal, make a little note of cool things that you come up with. I remember when I was at Dine, for example... I can't remember what the customer was called. Do you guys remember when New York hit, was it Sandy or Irene? Like, one of those hurricanes that was really bad, Rishi?

Rishi Mathur:

Sandy.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. Sandy did a ton of damage to New York, including flooding. There was a story that we heard about... I can't remember what company it was, because it was so long ago now. The company was literally... all the IT and network guys were going upstairs in the building, and they were moving all the server code upstairs, and they were draining the room that had...

Ryan O'Hara:

They had sub pumps and buckets because their server room was just filling up with water and their website couldn't go down. They were so afraid of their website going down, but they had to drain buckets and drain water. That was a great LinkedIn post for me. I told that story.

Ryan O'Hara:

I'm like, this is what it's about. This is why we're here. This is why we're helping people. This is some cool stuff that you want to make sure you have ready in case this stuff happens, because it will. That's a neat narrative story that has a conflict, a solution, what they actually did, what are they doing moving forward so it doesn't happen again. You can tell those stories whenever you're doing these posts.

Daniel Disney:

And everyone has those stories, I get a lot of sales reps and SDRs that are new in a role. Maybe they're a few months in, a year in, and they're worried that, "I don't have the knowledge or experience to share. I can't be an expert on LinkedIn," and you don't need to. People don't want to be preached to. As you say, Ryan, they just want stories. end everyone has them.

Daniel Disney:

Even if you're a month into your sales role, you would have had stories from your journey to getting the job, your training experience, your first few conversations. People love those stories. You don't have to name drop your customers or your prospects, but you can still share the stories of what happened, the challenges.

Daniel Disney:

As you say, perfectly put, that's what people want to see. They want to be entertained. They want to see how you overcame challenges. They want to hear what's happening in your world. People buy from people, so share your stories and show them you as a human being.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. What was the question you were going to ask, Rishi, before I rudely cut you off?

Rishi Mathur:

No. Yeah, you both answered it. Dave just answered it with the second statement, so it's been answered. Thank you so much.

Ryan O'Hara:

Good. Get out of here, dude. Get out. So, one of the things that we could actually transition to, as we're getting close to time on this stuff, let's talk a little bit about... Let's pretend that you see a customer, or a prospect you're trying to break into, and they put a post up that's basically something that's like the perfect opportunity for you to pitch to them. Like, "I need help finding blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." What do you do, Daniel? Talk about it. What's the best case scenario? What should you do in that situation?

Daniel Disney:

I love this scenario. It's something I teach in every session, and I'm going to share with you a story of a company that did it 50% right. So, I went and delivered some training. I think it was about a year and a half ago, and ironically enough, a week before I was due to deliver training, someone in my network posted a post like that saying, "I'm looking for this."

Daniel Disney:

They were looking for the products that this company sold. So, I tagged in the director who was my contact, who had booked me to train, and did the whole, "I'd recommend this company. They're great, blah, blah, blah." So, the week goes by. I then drove up, get ready to deliver training. We're just having a coffee before we get started, and I mentioned to the director, I said, "Oh, did you notice I tagged you in that post? That was a really hot lead, looked like a great company.

Daniel Disney:

I'm hoping that worked out well for you guys." And the director put their hands up and said, "Oh no, I haven't really been on LinkedIn. I didn't see it." Obviously, instant problem there, but one of the reps put their hand up and said, "Oh, I saw that you did that, so I've connected with the prospect. I sent them a message. I engaged in the post." I was like, "Well, that's brilliant. We haven't even done the training yet. That's a very proactive social approach to do." So I said, "Okay, it's been a week. What happened next?" And they said, "Oh, I'm just waiting for them to reply."

Ryan O'Hara:

No.

Daniel Disney:

And I go, "Oh no, what do you mean, waiting for them to reply?" This is the reality. So, if we take a step back very quickly, if someone posts like that, obviously your first basic steps are click like and write a comment, but again, play it cool. You'd be surprised how many sales reps, when they see a post like that, will write something like, "I can definitely help you with this."

Daniel Disney:

It's like, how do you know? You've not actually spoken to them. You don't know the details. Or they'll put, "I can help you with this. Here's my phone number, so you can call me," It's not going to happen. Play it cool. Something like, "Hi John. This might be something we could help with. I'd love to chat and explore it in more detail. I'll pop you a quick message to see if we can arrange a call." Something like that. Play it cool.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. Take it... Don't pitch in the actual comment. Say that you're going to do something over direct message, promote, whatever the other thing you're to do. Oh, so, you want to hear a funny story that we did once?

Daniel Disney:

Yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, one time, Jeremy Levine and I saw an account that we'd been trying to break into for a long time, was asking about different data providers. The person did a post about, "What do you guys think of this tool versus this tool?" and they didn't mention us. This is a couple of years ago, when we were still smaller and stuff. So, I grabbed a video card and I recorded a video, and I just went... and I cleared my throat and then just ended the recording, and I posted the link to the video card on the continents, with nothing else.

Ryan O'Hara:

Then I wrote a message to the person over a cold email and said, "Hey, I just commented on your post for with a cough video. It'd be cool if we could get a meeting. I'll make sure I take some cough drops before we do it," and we got the meeting. They booked and they thought it was really funny. The neat part is, I could see other people watch, that we're recommending and commenting on the posts, because you don't have those recommendation posts go.

Ryan O'Hara:

Lots of people usually come in with comments and stuff. Mine was the top liked comment and I went to the video, I looked at the analytics and it had 400 plays from just people clicking it. The posts had a... It was from a pretty big company. So, there were a lot of people commenting on it, but it had a lot of plays. Obviously. I couldn't see who played it, because it's anonymous data, but you can do some creative, fun stuff that isn't pitching.

Ryan O'Hara:

If I were one of my competitors... I've actually saw this, this week. I did a post about this on Monday. LinkedIn has sponsored posts that are coming up now, and I saw one of my competitors with a sponsored post, and I saw another competitor just feature dumping and pitching their product in the same ad on the post. First off, it's a paid ad. The admin on that ad is going to delete the post. If you're going to pitch your own products, you're wasting your time.

Ryan O'Hara:

Second, you're making your company look like an ambulance chaser, and that's not what you want to do. You want to be someone that's classy, take the high road, never crap on the competition publicly anywhere. Don't crap on them privately, actually. There's enough room for everybody at the table, but the idea is, think of a creative way to tackle it, that shows that you're not just a normal Joe somebody. You're somebody special. Your prospect's someone's special. Be creative, be fun. People want to work with creative and fun people.

Rishi Mathur:

Wait. So, you're not supposed to chase ambulances?

Ryan O'Hara:

Well, listen. That Walter Disney guy guy was doing some weird things at the beginning of the set. He probably is chasing some ambulances. So, maybe that's what's happening. So Daniel, we have a couple of other things that we want to tackle. By the way, everyone that's participating. If you want to ask Daniel a question, maybe you came in a little late or something, this is the time to do it, because we are going to have to wrap up in a couple minutes. While we're waiting for questions to come in, I wanted to ask you, Daniel. So your book, The Million Pound LinkedIn Message, what was the million pound LinkedIn message? Everyone wants to know. Spoiler alert.

Daniel Disney:

I'm obviously not going to give away the entire message, but it was a message I sent that got me into the door of a big opportunity, that closed a million pound sale. The whole story wraps around the process from A to B, from finding the opportunity, from connecting, that message, and everything after that message that then led to the signed deal. What the book also includes, because there is no one size fits all, you can't take that message template, spam it out and expect to get tons of results.

Daniel Disney:

So, the book who also has 25, tried, tested, proven LinkedIn message templates, just because everyone's different. You've got different industries, different seniority's, different departments, and it's trying to find the right message to send. I think the common theme that I will share, that you'll see through all of the messages, and I'm sure you guys would have seen this in the best messages, is they are real genuine messages. They've either done their homework.

Daniel Disney:

They really believe they can help. They're short and sweet. They just tick those really basic boxes, yet so many people, they either lock some third-party system with a copy and paste message, or they sit there with a template and just spam it out hundreds of times a day, and not an effective approach. So, just a golden tit with messaging, have real conversations. Just go out there and talk to people you think you can help. The whole spray and pray, I can't stress this enough, really doesn't work.

Rishi Mathur:

Wow.

Ryan O'Hara:

The best way to start that is to live off LinkedIn. Start your prospecting there. I think it's the best place anyway.

Daniel Disney:

Definitely. It's a gold mine of information. There is tons of information, opportunities, whether it's information in their profile, information on their company page, engagement that you can do to their content, information you can find from their content. I mean, it is a gold mine and it doesn't take long to mine that gold either. It's not hidden very far.

Ryan O'Hara:

So, one thing we should probably talk about a little bit with people, is how to make content, and how to plan your content correctly, if you're a rep. I think one question I want to ask, you have great content, Daniel, when you do this stuff.

Daniel Disney:

Thank you.

Ryan O'Hara:

What's your balance? What's your schedule like, when you're putting stuff out, so that you stay in the relevant news feeds for your buyers?

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. I mean, I've been doing content on LinkedIn now for maybe five to six years, pretty much consistently on a daily basis. It does get hard, the longer you do it, to keep creative. I guess the thing that I try to do is make sure I'm immersed in my industry all the time. So, always reading new books, watching shows like this, attending webinars, listening to podcasts, consuming myself with the industry content so that I always have ideas, and I know what's relevant and right. Right now.

Daniel Disney:

Not trying to just jump in, having not been on LinkedIn for five days and dropping a post. A lot happens in that time. So, just being active. One of the things that we dismiss, and I say control it, but just read through your newsfeed. Control that. I've spoken to people that lose an hour, two hours, just sat there scrolling. Make sure you control that time, but 10, 15 minutes, a couple of times a day, just keeps you at the center of your industry, your connections, to know what's happening, what everyone's talking about, and it should give you a good guideline as to what's right to write about.

Ryan O'Hara:

One tip I have is check with...

Rishi Mathur:

[crosstalk 00:42:06], if you ask me.

Ryan O'Hara:

Oh, sorry, go ahead. What did you say, Rishi?

Rishi Mathur:

Yeah. What are some ways that you control it? Because it's the hardest thing to control. When you're looking at feeds, like in Instagram or wherever, you just go, right? And you lose so much time without realizing. So what are some ways you'd handle that?

Daniel Disney:

Set time limits. So, I will set myself a physical time and then I'll say, right. Okay, it's eight o'clock now. I'm going to do 15 minutes or half an hour, and I'll just keep an eye on the time. You just got to be strict with it. It's a discipline thing. Obviously, if you're in the office, can be a bit easier where you've got your manager or your colleagues around you to keep an eye on it. When you're at home, less of that around, it's a self-discipline thing.

Ryan O'Hara:

I recommend, for me, I actually do it a lot in the bathroom, and when I wake up. That's my two places I'm usually checking LinkedIn for stuff. A lot of you that follow me on LinkedIn, that message me, you might notice I'll message you. I'm usually checking LinkedIn messages before bed. That's the three spots that I do. So, I check LinkedIn in the morning when I wake up, when I use the bathroom for a longer period of time, and that's my vague way to say that, but I think you can fill in the blanks, and at night, before I go to bed. That's the three areas that I try.

Ryan O'Hara:

I want to check it during the business day sometimes, but it gets out of hand sometimes with just getting distracted and not doing stuff. Thank you. Walter Disney Company just answered the question, said what I was translating, too, for people that didn't know. One thing I'd recommend, and this is really deep, don't overthink this, people listening. I'm just going to explain something to you. I would rather be known and seen by a thousand people regularly, than seen once by 40,000 people, or a hundred thousand people.

Ryan O'Hara:

A good way to look at that and think about that perspective is to infiltrate a network over and over and over again. So, when you're just starting out and you're putting stuff on social, you might not have a big audience. You can do some low hanging fruit stuff on your own, and you'll get some people that engage on it, but if you want to build an audience like Daniel has, some of the other people that are out there. John Gross has a crazy following, too.

Ryan O'Hara:

Some of these people, what they do is they actually started out with putting out posts with people, and then you tag those people. You can do this with prospects, especially right now. Perfect time to go get a prospect and say, "Hey, can we hop on a three-minute Zoom? I'm going to ask you one question. I'm going to hit record, ask you the question, how do you answer it, and then get out of the Zoom, and then I want to put that up on LinkedIn," because Zoom can record stuff for you, as long as it's really short.

Ryan O'Hara:

Don't make it more than five minutes long. Ask one question. When you put the post up, tag that person that was in the video. Now, here's the other cool part. The reason I say video, by the way, is because you're a rep. You're probably pretty good at talking to people already, if you're a sales rep. If you're not and you're introverted, you can do something over writing, instead of just doing a written post.

Ryan O'Hara:

"I asked this customer, X customer, this question. This was their response," and you can transcribe it. If you're more comfortable being on camera or doing something like this on Zoom with a webcam, do that recording, ask that question, record it, post it, and give them the file, too, so they post it. When people come in and like on it, if you see those people and some of them might be good prospects, ask them if they could... Try and sell to them. Say, "Hey, I saw you liked my video." It'll be way better and more personalized.

Ryan O'Hara:

If they say they're not interested, or they're not a good fit, ask those people to be in contact with you next, because what will happen is the network circle that they have, you'll keep coming up in the same people's feeds that are mutual connections with all these people, and before long, a lot of people will follow you in that same group and be familiar with you. Daniel. It's probably like this for you. When you go to conferences, how many people message you and say, "Hey, I saw you past five. We should talk." Well, you probably see that all the time, right?

Daniel Disney:

Yeah, tons. Ryan, I got to say, that was solid gold advice. The key point for me is consistency. So, many people try and drop in once a week. Once a week, if you can try and do at least every day, dropping at least one piece of content and engaging on a few posts, you're there. You grow an audience just by keeping that up.

Daniel Disney:

I see people come in and within a month, two months, they've built really strong audiences, a really strong personal brand just by sharing content on a regular basis. That consistency piece is so important. Again, it doesn't take time. It can literally take 10 minutes a day to build a strong personal brand. Not a lot of times.

Ryan O'Hara:

By the way, I know a lot of people here, it's the end of the month. We're trying to get this going every two weeks. So, if you did watch this show and you missed the beginning of it, we will email out a recording. It's probably going to take a night or two to cut it down for everyone, but there will be a recording available for everyone to watch. So, don't be discouraged if you missed it. If you manage to come in late, feel free to ask questions and we'll close out the show in a little bit. Daniel, what's going on with you and your life. What do you want to plug?

Daniel Disney:

Well, obviously I've got my book, Million Pound LinkedIn Message is on Amazon, paperback and Kindle. So, if anyone's interested in learning how to use LinkedIn messaging, it's got tons of social selling tips in there. It's got a profile guide and stuff like that. I'm working on book number two at the moment.

Daniel Disney:

Actually, I'm working on book number two, three, and four, which is not the smartest thing to do, but I can't get off these ideas. So, that's my big focus whilst we're stuck at home, in between virtual training, virtual coaching. I'm just trying to write as much as possible before the doors open, and I can get back out, peaking and training again. So, yeah, a lot of writing at the moment.

Ryan O'Hara:

Free Daniel. That's all that people were saying.

Daniel Disney:

#FreeDaniel, yeah.

Ryan O'Hara:

#FreeDaniel. Get him out of his cage. So, we actually had some... That's a cool idea, Ian. You just gave me an idea. So, Ian Doyle, in the questions, that has my LinkedIn profile, I actually think it'd be a very cool exercise... maybe LeadIQ will do something where we'll go through LinkedIn profiles for people.

Ryan O'Hara:

We do this thing with email called Rate My Pitch, where you can send cold emails to us and we'll rip them apart over a live stream with people. It's fun. It's productive. It's not to crap on people. We can maybe do the same thing with profiles at some point. Maybe we'll do that as a segment in a future B2B Tonight show. I do want to let people know some house cleaning stuff, too.

Ryan O'Hara:

We are going to be doing these pretty consistently. So, get on our email list. You obviously are, if you saw this, but tell others about it, because we're going to try and keep feeding these things and answering things for people. The other cool part about this is, there's no rules. We can have Daniel Disney on every week, if we wanted to.

Rishi Mathur:

And maybe we will.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, he's stuck in a cave. He's stuck in England right now. He dying to get out.

Rishi Mathur:

Did you say a cave? I mean, what?

Ryan O'Hara:

I just assumed that... You guys want to hear something crazy? Everyone's going to be blown away by this and judge me. I've never left the United States. Is that insane? I live four hours from the Canadian border and I've never been at all.

Daniel Disney:

That is crazy.

Ryan O'Hara:

The borders are closed, so it doesn't make a difference to me. I'd had several trips planned. Last year I was supposed to talk into the night in Toronto and the trip got canceled because my passport didn't come in time, but I plan on doing a lot more traveling, and Rishi and I might even take this on the road this year, if it gets popular enough.

Rishi Mathur:

Yep.

Ryan O'Hara:

Go ahead, Rishi. Yeah. Sorry.

Rishi Mathur:

There's a question to Daniel. With so much webinar attending right now, what's your opinion on reaching out to an attendee that you saw on the same webinar, and you know as an ideal customer profile? Do you view that as creepy or just being aware of an opp, or both?

Daniel Disney:

No, as long as you go about it in a nice way. I mean, salespeople make it creepy by what they say and the way they approach it. Doesn't have to be creepy. I can message Rishi and say, Rishi, I saw you were on the B2B Tonight show watching that.

Rishi Mathur:

Wow.

Daniel Disney:

I found him hilarious. Go down that road.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, I think it's an okay trigger because it's showing that you did research. Maybe what I would do is bring up a point from the webinar that you really liked and ask them for their opinion, People love, by the way, sharing their opinions. You can editorialize different opinions. IF you have in business, with your prospects, it's a really cool thing to do. It's fun. It creates debate a little bit. I'm sure there's stuff we disagree on, Daniel. We just didn't find them today.

Daniel Disney:

Yeah, well I'm sure we'll do more of these in the future. I'm keen to come back at some point, and maybe we we could do the profile thing together, because I think it's a brilliant idea, but I'm sure we'll find stuff that we disagree on. There's got to be something there.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah, something, but the thing is, people have different experiences of things...

Daniel Disney:

Maybe it's Taylor Swift.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. Hey. How dare you? Let's do last call for questions here, if people have some stuff. We got some people in the comments things and stuff. Hi Chris from [Match Molo 00:50:31]. Haven't seen it all on time, dude. I hope the quarantine has been good to you. One thing that I was thinking about, that I wanted to close out with a little bit, Daniel, is how often should people post, if they're just starting out? Obviously, you post every day. I try to post two or three times a week. What's your schedule like? What would you do if you're a rep?

Daniel Disney:

Two or three times a week is a good starting point. So, I recommend two or three times a week for the first month or two. The ultimate goal, really, is to Monday to Friday, once a day. Don't go past that. If you start posting more than once a day, A, it goes against the algorithm. B, it just becomes over promotional and your audience will start to have negative feelings towards it. Once a day is the optimum amount, but at the start, two or three times a week is a good place to start.

Ryan O'Hara:

You know what else? I'm sorry. I hope we're okay if we go a little over time, because some of the people came in a little late on this. One other thing I wanted to tell people, to recommend is, if you use LinkedIn Sales Navigator, you should totally leverage your prospect's connections and your customer's connection. So, if you're an account executive and you just closed a big customer, let's say you're in the software space and you sell seats.

Ryan O'Hara:

Go add the people that are going to be using that account on LinkedIn. A lot of them won't protect their connections by default. So, on LinkedIn sales navigator, you can actually go click on someone's profile, see their connections and set up filters, and then prospect those people. You can say, "Hey, I was working with blah, blah, blah, and I saw you're connected to them." That's a great first introduction for a cold email or a cold call.

Ryan O'Hara:

Now you have something to talk about over email or over the phone, that you can use. It's honestly, like the response rates are great when you do that stuff. The other neat part is if they don't know that person, if you actually can ask that customer, ask them for a couple of people that they know for recommendations or referrals. You can say like... Don't just say, "Hey, do you know anyone that can use my product?"

Ryan O'Hara:

Go on LinkedIn, find a couple of people that they're connected with that fit your market, and say, "Hey, blah, blah, blah. I saw you know Jimmy. I saw you know Daniel. I saw you know Rishi. Can I name drop you in an email? Do you mind?" Or, "Would you mind writing an intro to me? I know you're getting a lot of value out of what we're doing and how we're helping you, and stuff." Leverage the networks graph to help you with prospecting. You can find a lot of good accounts and prospects that way.

Daniel Disney:

Well, that's gold. I love the statistic. I'm a bit out on the numbers, but it's something like 91% of customers say they'd be happy to recommend or refer someone, but like 11% of salespeople ask for them. And whether it's going direct for a referral or trying to find a middleman to provide that introduction, most people are happy to do that. It's a small effort just to ask that question, to potentially create a really hot lead. So, yeah. It's awesome. Awesome tip.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. So let's wrap up a little bit, Daniel. What do you want people to do? Add you on LinkedIn, obviously, would be a nice thing, right?

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. Hey, if anyone wants to follow me, learn more about the world of LinkedIn and social selling, I'm on LinkedIn. I'm on all social media channels and there's content on my website, danieldisney.online. For anyone who's interested, the book's on, on Amazon. But if anyone has any questions, I'm keen to help. I'm passionate about helping salespeople and sales teams learn how to master social. So, any questions, pop me a message. I'm happy to answer.

Ryan O'Hara:

Do you want people to add a personalized LinkedIn message, or what's best practice there?

Daniel Disney:

Most people do. Some people try and make it humorous, which is funny. Yeah. It does help, but I'm not too judgey.

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. I like to look at them. I think, listen, if you're going to send personalized LinkedIn messages, do not do soft personalization. Really personalize it. Don't do mutual connections. Don't just say like something, "I see we're in similar industries." Do not do that. If you're going to do the personalized LinkedIn message, because some people are saying-

Daniel Disney:

Do it properly.

Ryan O'Hara:

... do it properly and you'll get a good response rate. I think that pretty much wraps it up for us, for people. If you have questions, you can email us. We're going to email a recording out to everyone on Friday, at the latest Monday, but it'll probably be tomorrow that we send it out. One last thing I want to plug and let people know. We're working on an episode that we're going to be doing, upcoming, with David Delaney, from from [inaudible 00:54:36]. Big fan of David.

Ryan O'Hara:

I've been to a ton of his conferences and seen a lot of his talks. He's a really brilliant mind in prospecting, and we're going to talk with him. I don't know what the date yet. We're still locking that up with him, but he's on the upcoming list. We've got a couple of other really cool people that will be on, too. So, if you have questions or anything, DM me on LinkedIn.

Ryan O'Hara:

Hit up Rishi. You can reply to our email. Recording will be out tomorrow or Monday. Please go at Daniel on LinkedIn. I'm losing my voice, I'm getting emotional. Thank you everyone. We appreciate it. And thank you to the Walter Disney company for not suing us. We really appreciate it.

Rishi Mathur:

They still are, but we're not going to let them. Get out of here, Walter Disney!

Ryan O'Hara:

Yeah. Get out!

Rishi Mathur:

Also, by the way, Daniel, last thing, Million Pound LinkedIn, they can get it on Amazon. Obviously, it's a story about how you got a million pounds from a sale. What did you do with those million pounds?

Daniel Disney:

That's a good question. I was a sales rep at a time, so that million pounds went into the company's kitty and I made a very tiny commission check, and it wasn't bad. I can't complain, but it certainly wasn't a million pounds, unfortunately.

Ryan O'Hara:

He used that to get really good images made on LinkedIn for his header.

Daniel Disney:

Yeah. That's my background image. That's how I got such a good background image.

Ryan O'Hara:

That's a good [inaudible 00:55:50] background image. Thank you very much for being on, Daniel. Bye everyone else. Thank you for coming on. We really appreciate it.

Daniel Disney:

Thank you.

Rishi Mathur:

And thank you, Wendy. It was a magical time.

Ryan O'Hara:

I feel like we became adults during this time. It was very nice. Bye everyone.

Daniel Disney:

Bye guys. That was really fun.